Guest User
2/25/2003
Hello, I plan to build a seasonal cabin in northern Minnesota and would like any comments on my plan for the roof. Roof trusses will be 4/12 or 6/12 pitch - 24" O.C., sheathing is 1/2" plywood with 30# felt over the top and a water barrier type self-adhesive material under the felt on all the edges. Vapor barrier of 6 mil poly in all rooms including ceiling. 6 1/2" of fiberglass batt insulation in the ceiling. The soffets will be vented aluminum and I plan to put additional vents in the gables. One half of the interior ceiling will be common trusses and one half will be scissor trusses for a vault. I'm installing channels on the underside of the roof sheathing so the batts do not block air movement. The roofing itself will probably be a standing seam type. Is this a sound plan? Thank you.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
2/25/2003
This sounds very well thought out. The only thing I would add is a ridge vent which is appropriate for the roof system you choose.
Guest User
2/26/2003
I do intend to install a ridge vent. I want as much air movement as possible, outside of a powered unit to move the air. I'm looking for install information in general for a standing seam system. How the trim pieces fit, overhang dimensions, a simple step by step process overview, etc, to give me a good understanding of what's expected for a proper install. I've been to websites that have good cross-sectional views of parts but nothing that puts it all together like an exploded view. Can I expect this info to be available from whichever manufacturer I go with and/or is there a website that has this info available? Since I'm gonna be the installer, I want as much info as possible. Thank you.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
2/26/2003
Most of our member manufacturers have the technical information available however some only sell through a trained contractor network. Please choose a style and interview the manufacturer. If you do not feel comfortable with the information and support supplied move to another.
Guest User
2/28/2003
JerryK, If you are going to use ridge and soffit vents, then do not install the gable vents. Soffit-ridge venting should provide the best overall air movement - gable vents will only contribute to "dead" spaces.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
3/1/2003
Time has proven that a balanced ridge/soffit works best obviously because warm air rises. The sofit lets it in and the ridge lets it out. There are cases such as square buildings with hip roofs that leave no room for either ridge or gable vents and pot or hip vents need to be used. Anyways the best thing you can do is to balance the eaves and ridge vent and put in more than the 1/150 formula calls for. Gable vents can with wind direction syphon air and elements into the attic and yes create dead spots. Remeber balance ridge and eaves is best and make sure that the insulation does not block the air flow. Then don't forget a good quality underlayment and an air barrier to the inside of the ceiling to stop air loss. Good luck.
Guest User
3/11/2003
We have a chalet and we planned on putting a metal roof on replacing our shingles. We got some unrealistic price quotes from roofers. Our roof is very simple 2 sides 32 x 36. Would you suggest if it is wise to install ourselves. Is it harder than shingles? Do you know where we can find out how?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
3/11/2003
There are homeowners installing their own metal roofs. Complexity of this project varies based upon the product you choose and also based upon the configuration, pitch, and condition of your current roof. Many metal roof systems have various pre-formed flashings available. However, there can still be instances when special flashings need to be formed on the job, requiring skill and special tools. With most metal roofs, labor time will run from three to five "person hours" per square, more for a very complex roof. This does not include time for removing an old roof or doing any decking repairs. I suggest using the MRA website to find some products you like and then inquire with the manufacturers as to the feasibility / availability of DIY installation. Make sure that good factory support, including detailed instructions, is available from the manufacturer and for the product you choose.
Guest User
11/1/2003
I am getting ready to install a corrugated galvume roof on my house. I have removed the existing shingles and put down #30 felt. I have used 5/8" x 3" furring stripps every 2' up the roof (14' x 40' on each side) My questions are these. My roof has some ripples in it (trusses and plywood warped) so I had to shim the furring strips.Even still it was impossible to get it perfectly level,will this create any problems? Also can I use a quality exterior silicone sealant in the seams for extra water protection? What is the proper way of flashing the gable edges? I know these are alot of questions but I am a first time installer. My father- in- law is assisting me who is quite knowlegabel about construction but is a little confused on the proper way to install this type of roof on a residential home. I will probobly have more question but will save them for later. I am probobly going to start laying my panels mid_next-week so a reply by then would be most appreciated Thankyou.
Guest User
11/1/2003
What is the cost of metal roofing per square?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
11/3/2003
The Metal Roofing Alliance is an association of competing roofing manufacturers and suppliers. Our anit-trust guidelines prevent us from addressing cost in public forums such as this. However, I will say that one of the great things about metal roofing is the wide variety of products and styles. Along with that is a wide range of prices. Please contact individual manufacturers and they can help you obtain the pricing information you seek.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
11/3/2003
I hate to say this but the answers to all of your questions are dependent upon the exact metal roof panel you're installing. I am very sorry but I cannot answer them without running a huge risk of giving you bad information. A couple of ideas... 1) I really suggest contacting the manufacturer of the roofing and asking these questions. If you cannot determine who manufactured the roofing, to put it bluntly, look for different roofing. 2) As a last result, if you can email me photos of the roofing you're installing, I will do my best to help you. My email is [email protected]
Guest User
11/10/2003
I am building a porch/3 season room on to a home that has a metal roof. The roof of my porch is a stress skin panel--aluminum exposed to the inside, 4" of foam and OSB. I plan to cover the OSB with Grace Snow and Ice Shield. Can I install the metal roofing over that with out puting down strapping first? Thanks Dan Kramer
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
11/10/2003
More information would be helpful such as location and positioning of the addition in relation to the existing house however here goes. Assuming that the roof is adjoing into the side of the home and that it will have a relatively low slope, you should be fine with a standing seam roof. There are potential issues of wind uplift resistance and the connection to OSB. Consult the manufacturer of the roofing panel for their recommendations. You may have snow and ice falling from an upper roof so direct to deck provides the best protection from damage. make sure you choose a thicker steel and stonger profile in this situation. I would choose a lighter colour and recommend that you buy the upper grade of ice and water (Grace has 3 grades) and make sure that you have a good eaves detail with a drip edge and the ice and water over. Consider choosing a lighter colour so that you do dot have as much heat transfer into the panel for the summer months. Last there is a great thin mesh material that is used under wood shingles. I strongly suggest installing this between the roof sheets and the ice and water as it allows condensation to work its way out but stops heat transfer. Remeber you are putting a permanant roof on so you do not want to kill the ice and water product properties off. Good luck.
ken dunn
11/13/2003
Our local building inspectors will not approve CCA treated lumber for perlins. The contention is that the chemicals used to do CCA treating will interact with metal roofing material and galvanized screws to produce an electrolytic action which will erode screwholes and eventually lead to leaking, Is this true?
Guest User
11/13/2003
I would not use treated lumber due to the possibility of electrolysis occurring, prompted by the chemicals.
Guest User
11/25/2003
I have installed a self adhesive barrier under roof replacement projects in the past but I can't remember the brand name (I think it was made by GAF). Any ideas?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
11/25/2003
There are a number of self-adhering "ice and watershield" type of products available. I believe that GAf calls theirs Weathershield if I remember correctly. Vycor is another brand. There are several. To avoid scratching of the back of the metal roofing, do not use products which have a granulated surface.
Guest User
1/19/2004
Our cabin is at 5,000 feet elevation in the mountains of southern California. In general. it is very dry. There is no attic in the cottage, the cedar ceiling being nailed directly to the underside of the 2x8 rafters. The roof is sheeted with OSB. The roof membrane I have installed is in two layers: The lower layer is StormGuard plastic membrane with adhesive tar on the bottom side. I then sheeted over that wih a 30 lb felt. Both membranes cover the entire roof including overhangs. Finally, I put 24 gauge zinc-alum corugated on top. An architect neighbor questioned whether I need to vent the void between the roof and ceiling. Instead, I had planned to put a "non breathing" vapor barrier between the cedar ceiling and the rafters to prevent warm air (although the air is very dry I know warm air holds more moisture than cold air) from the room from entering the void and then having the moisture condense out, possibly causing dry rot. If the vapor barrier insn't enough can I treat the rafters and the underside of the OSB to get by?The cabin is only used less than two months a year. Do I need vents?
Guest User
1/19/2004
Your reasoning is pretty sound. If you can make sure that your vapor barrier is complete so that moisture cannot seep around it, this should work. All in all, though, the safest thing would be to use soffit vents and ridge vents. An additional benefit to venting is to help keep the cabin cooler in summer. Sounds like a great place you have there!
Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.