Guest User
8/22/2002
First of I like the Idea of metal roofing. And I can purchase it for around $2.50 a square foot.From there it all goes down hill. Some one please explain to me how these installers then get $750.00 per square. I have a 6 pitch new construction roof with access completely around the building. Not a single valley on the roof. All hips and their all the same measurement. I can have it asphalt shingled (architectural) for $7000.00 including materials.The cheapest price I've gotten is $30,000 for simple standing seam, Painted metal not gold or copper. Also their are more variables to how to install it, and I have yet to get the same answer twice.The more I research this industry, the more I think their are more people out there who have no clue what there doing and charging an arm and a leg for it!! I think a crew could come in and metal roof this house for about 25% more labor time than asphalt. Some one explain to me where the other $20,000 goes?
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
8/23/2002
Looks like Todd left this one to me. Here goes. The asphalt shingle industry have their products in catagories of 20, 25, 30, 40 and now some are even taking a 40 to a 50 etc. Basically it allows one to shop between manufacturers and choose by avilability and appearance. Metal roofing on the other hand has been divided into vertical seam, shingles and panels. You can then subdivide the vertical seam panels into through fastened and seamed. Then we can look at the seamed panels and they are split between nail flanged fastened or set on clips and further then the clips can be fixed or floating and theseam can be just interlocked or truly mechanically seamed. Next we must look at the substrate options available with metal roofing. You can buy an agricultural panel that could be a very thin sheet with a G60 galvanized coating or continue up in thickness and have a G90 galvanized or a AZ 50 and 55 Galvalume metalic coating. Then we must look at the finishes available from bare and painted. Then in the paint one could have a thin polyester paint used on an agricultural panel up through the siliconised modified polyesters and Kynar/Hylar 500 coatings with ceramic pigments. One must chose a product that will meet your needs over the long term. Warranties are available today on metal roofing that include both coating and performance and unlike the shingle industry one truly expects the roof to last as long or longer than represented. Our company alone as example spends on average of $45,000 US per year in testing and product approvals to help ensure the public that our metal roofs as represented will perform. I suggest that you investigate the differances in the systems that you are mentioning above and ask for referances, then go check some out. You are making a lifetime decision and you are right to question the value. I know that when our firm trains contractors we spend a considerable amount of time reiforcing the fact that this is a lifetime roof and as such all the accessories and quality of labour in the assembly must reflect this. In summary I do not believe one can make the comparrisson without all the details and it could be that the contractors you talked too are very busy and adjusted their quote to meet the timelines of construction that were set down. Good luck.
Guest User
9/5/2002
Perhaps you can help with something that has puzzled me for some time. Why does steel roofing cost more than fiberglass asphalt, when intuitively one would expect the reverse to be true? Are the manufacturers, because they have a relatively new product, seeking huge profits, or is there something about manufacturing steel roofs that's significantly different from other steel products?
Guest User
9/22/2002
I am looking to recoat my existing Standing Seam metal roof. I am trying to find the best products out there to use so i don't have to do this for the next 50 years. I would like a one and done solution. Is there a product i can use. What about a polyurethane finish like RhinoLining. I know they manufacture it for roofs, but how good is it. What is the life expectancy? Where can i get it? What kind of cost am i looking at in materials. I would like to coat the roof in a Hunter Green. What would be my best soulutions. Cost is a slight variable, I don't want to go overboard. What kind of cost am I looking at for different product per square yard. Can you give me a few solutions for coatings, and where I can buy the materials.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
9/24/2002
First I would ask if your existing material was originally a bare or a painted material. Then if it was painted I would like to know the service life that you got out of the paint and if it was short, then why it failed. It is very difficult to comment on recoating as each roof will have its own set of needs. If your roof is showing signs of oxidation, then you will need to prime the spots with a good quality rust inhibitor primer. The entire roof needs to be washed with a mildly caustic to clean it and etch into the existing surface. Then one should primer and paint it with a high quality paint such as a Kynar/Hylar500 based material. We will not comment on brand names in this forum however if you are located south of the Maso-Dixon line you need to be concerned over the strong UV rays that plastic coatings do not have a good performance with. In the reverse if you are in a strong industrial environment like downwind from an oil refinery then you do want the good chemical resistance of plastic coatings. Their are no standards that I know of for recoating of metal roofs. Each manufacturer typically has a recoating proccdure on their own products that is lisenced out to a few select contractors to perform. I would contact the manufacturer of the product on your roof if at all possible and get their advise. Failing that you should 1) contact an established commercial painting firm in your area and ask if they have experience and get their advise or 2) contact one of our associations paint manufacturers and ask if they can help.
Guest User
9/24/2002
Yes, The roof is approx. 100 years old. It was originally bare tine that has been coated over the years. It is an original roof. (when the house was built there where 3 types of roofs that would have been installed Slate, Standing seam Tin, Cedar shake shingle) Most of the existing homes in our area with the original roofs are Either Standing Seam Tin or Slate. The paint that use to be used was a thick roofing paint available in red or black. There was also a very thin aluminum paint. My roof has a combination of both. I have done this work before. I have also installed standing seam roofs. Tradition standing seam tin is not difficult to install provided you have the right tools for the job. The roof itself is quite simple in design. It is nothing more than a "rolled seam" with a strap fastening it from the underside. They also have many advantages over composite materials. They are much lighter in weight. They have a greater tensil strength. They are fire, and wind resistant. Material cost are relatively low; However, labor costs are astronomical. I believe because Standing seam is a dying art, most roofers do not possess the tools, or the knowledge. They last an indefinite amount of time, provided proper care. (my fathers roof was about 200 years old, most of the tin roof in our town are about 75- 100 years old and still going strong). If I paint the roof using a traditional roofing paint I can expect it to last about 5- 10 years. This will depend on the weather conditions. I am trying to find an alternative roofing coating that I can apply. I have found some information about about polyurathane coatings, like rhinolining that is used on truck beds, but am having a tough time finding manufactures, and reports on durability. I would also like to know of what type of products are out there with the same or better durability. I would like to find some type of coating that I can apply maybe twice in my lifetime.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
9/24/2002
Frankly you are right. Asphalt shingles do cost more money than steel over the life cycle of the roof. Yes metal costs more up front but basically you are doing the roofing once only and not every 12 years. Typically the life cycle costs cross over after around 25 years and then your metal roof is money in the bank. Metal roofing typically comes with warranties that are minimum expected life span where asphalt shingles issue warranties that are based on the maximum life expectancy. It's your call but we recommend doing it once and doing it right with metal.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
9/24/2002
There is no doubt today that we face a shortage of skilled trades in all aspects of construction. Some manufactuers like ourselves have a very detailed training program for contractors that the NRCA awarded us a Gold Circle Award on. The problem then is to find people willing to invest the time to learn a trade. As to the painting try Elf Atochem at 800 533 5552. They are participants in our association and manufature the Kynar resin.
Guest User
9/26/2002
My husband would like to do our porch roof on our new build with standing seam residential quality metal roofing. He knows how to do shingle roofing and has done it for us as well as friends and family many times. He is unsure about installation of a metal roof for the apprx. 300 sq. ft. porch roof on our new build. Is putting on a metal standing seam style roof on a porch (shed style roof) very difficult. Is there any way to get ideas/tips on how to go about it, etc. Could you any help we can get on the subject of installing it ourselves. We're in the Buffalo, NY area and could also use a tip on local dealers we could get the product from. Time is of the essence, would appreciate a timely response. Thanks Alot. Dorothy
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
9/27/2002
You really need to know the pitch on the porch roof. Sometimes, porches can have very low pitch roofs and, when that is the cas, that will really dictate what type of product you use. The tie-in between the porch and the existing house will be a delicate area. Ideally, you need a flashing that either goes behind the siding or into the masonry on the existing home and then out onto the metal roof. Other than that, your system will require some sort of eave and gable metal. When installing the roofing, you need to make sure that you're running the panels parallel to each other. The panels also need to be set so they're perpendicular to the eave or ridge or parallel to one of the gables. If the porch roof isn't square, that can be tricky. The type of roofing you choose will determine its fastening. Through-fastened sheet roofing uses gasketed screws that are put through holes you pre-drill in the roofing. Standing seam with concealed fasteners, depending upon the system you choose, uses either clips for fastening or a hidden nail flange. I do not know much about the Buffalo market. I suggest checking with local home centers for availability of metal roofing. Most of them stock sheet roofing and can special order true standing seams. You can also use the Find a Contractor feature on the MRA website to find metal roofing suppliers in your area or to locate contractors who will work with a do it yourselfer. You can also use this website to research and find a product you like and then contact the manufacturer concerning availability in your area.
Guest User
10/6/2002
Hello, We had a huge tree fall on the roof of our house, during a storm, now we are thinking of the aluminum roof. We have heard that we should use clips to install instead of screws. We have heard that steel last longer than aluminum but that if aluminum is skinned of paint it doesn't rust and steel will rust. We have been told that our enclosed side porch roof pitch is too low and water would back up underneath. We have been told that it would cost $5,000.00 in material just the main part of this old house. My husband is a carpenter, and is fighting me about putting on regular shingles, vs. metal roof. He doesn't know how to install a metal roof, but he is willing to learn how to do metal. I have always want a roof like my grandmothers, and I want it in a navy blue, we have a white house with red doors. I want a meal roof.....I can wait for the "L' as is called to be re-roofed at a later date. How much do you think a small cape roof should cost? Is it difficuilt to install, are there guidlines to follow? Can you get the navy blue color? Thank you for any information that might help get this job going! Betty Simmer
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
10/6/2002
First of all, thanks for your commitment to a metal roof. I am sure you'll be satisfied. There are many different profiles of aluminum and steel roofs. Some profiles use clips for fastening and others don't. The clips are usually secured with screws rather than nails. Many of the shingle systems, both steel and aluminum, are nailed down. The purpose of clips on standing seam profiles is to allow expansion and contraction of the metal. The fateners must be compatible with the metal of the roofing. Generally, this would mean you'd use the same metal as the roof. Some aluminum systems, though, use stainless steel and that is acceptable. Most shingle style metal roofs require a 3:12 or 4:12 pitch. Pitch is measured by the number of feet a roof rises in relationship to every 12' it goes back horizontally. Many standing seam roofs can be used down to 2:12. It really is a matter of picking a roof product you like, knowing your roof pitch, and then finding out from the manufacturer if the two are compatible. Most metal roofs have pre-formed accessories to simplify installation. Manufacturers will have installation instructions available. Aluminum will not red rust. I do not know any specific comparisons of aluminum versus steel in terms of life but I have seen some very very old roofs of both metals. By using this MRA website, you can link to manufacturers of various products. Many products are available in blue. The individual manufacturers, or their representatives, can discuss price with you. The MRA is a coalition of competing manufacturers. It violates antitrust bylaws for us to discuss pricing in a public forum.
Guest User
9/27/2007
we must be talking to the same contractors. I'm in the exact shape you are in. If you come across an answer to any of your and mine questions please let me know and i will do like wise. in my opinion i think we are being swindled cause our lack of knowledge of what these contractors and their crew can actually install. i think they do not know how to install the standing seam so they raise the cost to an unbelievable amount in hopes we go with one of their older products, or pay for their learning curve. i could probably sell roofs at this point as much as I've listened to these roof sales people.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
9/29/2007
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Guest User
10/16/2007
hey i want a metal roof as well was the 750 a square for the installer with or without the material. Also what area are you from. thanks
Guest User
10/16/2007
I live in buffalo ny and i want standing seam metal roof how much a square should i expect to pay. How much does the installer charge a square and is it with or without material. If anyone in the area could help me out i would appreciate it thankyou
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
10/18/2007
Pricing depends so much on exactly what sort of metal roof you choose, and how complex your roofing situation is. I am sorry -- there are just no general rules to go by.
Nate Libbey
5/23/2008
Pricing does vary greatly. Depending on the thickness of the panels, coats, painted vs. galvalume, panel width. Also the price of labor in one part of the country can be significantly different due to variations in the cost of living. For this reason I concur with Todd. The best thing in my opinion is to get multiple quotes, compare the products quoted, and request references from each roofer.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
5/29/2008
Thanks Nate.
Guest User
12/28/2009
Where do you live? I would be happy to help you with your roof for a great price! My email is [email protected] Thanks! Cas Semlak Transform Design
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