Guest User
8/19/2004
I recently had a copper roof installed over a bay window. It is 20 oz copper double lock 1 inch standing seam with no gutter. There are seven panels. The roof looks nice from a distance but on closer inspection reveals workmanship that has been called “a little sloppy” by one copper pro that has seen pictures. I think part of the reason (in addition to perhaps to the experience of applicator) is the use of 20 oz. copper vs. 16 oz copper. It is likely 20 oz. is tougher to bend and get seams to line-up, drip edge to line true to edge of fascia, etc. I realize custom work will look different than the prefab. However, my other concern is the method of finishing the “seam ends” of the standing seam. I think the Copper Development Organization has 2 methods for standing seam roof “seam ends”--one for gutters, and one for no gutters. Neither looks like the application on my project. My seam ends are not “dog ear” folded over, but are cut standing and have a small piece of the copper bent around the end of the seam to try to cover the seam end. A perfect cover of the end is impossible and there is typically about a one-quarter inch hole near the base of the seam end. Sometimes this was filled with black mastic. The seam ends generally look poor up close. One concern is aesthetics, the other is weather getting in through the seam ends and onto the substrate/top of fascia. Another concern is inspections… Also, the top counter flashing seems to have a rather large profile (like half a range hood), I think because the top seam ends are not folded over. Have you heard of the above approach in the industry?? Do you know the best approach for standing seam roofing “seam end” details without gutters?? (I have looked at the CDO website which is helpful but limited in examples.) Are you aware of any good pictures or websites available of seam end details for double lock standing seam roofing?? Copper bay roofing pictures and details?? Do you think 16 oz copper would be a better metal for workmanship and easier to work with for fit and finish (assuming panels are narrow enough)?? For a 1920s home traditional look, is there a better method than the double lock standing seam with no gutter?? thank you!!! home owner
Guest User
8/19/2004
I can email pics if needed. thanks
Guest User
8/20/2004
If you want to email pics, please feel free to do so. However, what you had done would fall under the category of "handcrafted metals" or "sheet metal work." This sort of thing, in your case, is largely decorative and you are largely at the mercy of the experience, creativity, and "caringness" of the craftsman. This contrasts sharply with prefabricated metal roof systems where many if not all of the parts are pre-made and where you have individual manufacturers specifying how their products should be installed. It is likely that SMACNA (Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Assoc) has some suggested details on this type of work.
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