Guest User
7/9/2004
I have recently put an addition on the house that runs at right angles to the original. Both have metal roofs. Problem is that the roof over the addition avalanches snow onto the other roof. Ice at this point builds up. Over last 2 years, we have observed as much as 24 inches of solid ice. Header must deform slightly, because a sliding door beneath roof get sticky, then frees up when ice melts. I've considered electrical heat tape, but suspect it would be scraped off by the glacier. Is there a product that will help this ice melt more quickly? Thanks, Russ Merrill
Guest User
7/10/2004
Valley situations can be tough because of the snow converging from two sides and then jamming in the middle. Snowguards can be helpful be keeping the snow from sliding so much. However, my general advice for ice damming is more insulation on top of the ceilings and better ventilation through the attic. Can this be done?
Guest User
7/26/2004
Insulation above the ceiling of the addition (ie, below the roof from which snow is avalanching) is R38 now. Part is accessible to add more, part is beneath an attic floor and inaccessible. Ventilation is by continuous soffit and ridge vents. Roof is pretty steep, perhaps 10 in 12. The area beneath the roof onto which the snow slides and on which it turns to ice is a loft open to heated space. There is not a lot of insulation (R13?) above that wooden ceiling, but we could add solid insulation below the ceiling if you thought it would help. The rafers are 4X4s, so we have 3 1/2 inches or so to work with.
Guest User
7/26/2004
No doubt about it, getting better insulation in that area is a good idea and would help undoubtedly. Will it solve the problem entirely? I really do not know.
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