Guest User
4/21/2004
I realize anything less than 3:12 typically calls for a standing seam roof. But I do specifically want to use corrugated steel panels. In Australia, these are common and don't seem to have water problems, e.g., BlueScope Steel's Lysaght Custom Orb specifies a minimum pitch of 1:12. Are they doing something differently?
Guest User
4/21/2004
That particular panel has a corrugation depth of 0.62" Many of the US panels are 1/2". The extra depth would help some but, all in all, I do not know how they'd be getting by with successful long term installations at 1:12 pitch. Butyl tape can be used on the seams to help but I still would not have much confidence in a corrugated panel installation at that low of a pitch.
Guest User
6/2/2004
They have several comercial and one residential that are specifically designed for 1:12 slopes. Specifically, the 1 1/2" SSR is one panel they make and they have a decent instalation guide availabel online.
Paul Banquer
6/6/2004
Todd, I have a roof that I'm estimating at the the is a 4:12 or 5:12 slope. When I remove a red clay ridge off the top, there is a 1/4 to 1 inch opening where I can actually reach my hand into the attic and vice versa when inside the attic. With a metal roof, this would indicate to me that when I do get flat r-panels installed, what will stop the water from backing up and going into my attic, say in a major thunderstorm or hurricane? Shouldn't some type of rubber guard be used even in a steep slope to stop the water from backing up? Is ventilation necessary. I have a gable roof with lattice ventilation on both sides of the cottage/bungalow style house. Once a metal roof would be installed, should I see light above where the ridge is, or should this be sealed some kind of way?
Guest User
6/6/2004
Paul, I am a strong believer in ventilation, ideally with soffit (eave overhang) vents for intake and ridge vent for exhaust. If you can do this, you will probably do best to close off the gable end vents and just let the natural soffit to ridge flow work. Look for a metal roof system which either has a matching pre-formed ridge vent or which has details for using a standard ridge vent product. Depending upon the instructions, you may need to open up your ridge hole a bit more than it is now. You will see some light through ridge vents. If you do not install a ridge vent and instead use a standard metal roofing ridge cap of some sort, then I would fill in at your current ridge with lumber. Make sure you use an appropriate underlayment.
Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.