Snow knocks over pipe and chimney

Ron Kluger
4/1/2004
We have a steep steel roof in an area that gets lots of snow. The snow builds up and then "avalanches" on a warmer day. There is a vent stack pipe for the sewage system and a stainless steel chimney. We have put blocks onto the roof. Still, when the snow comes down it knocks over the pipe (and pulled it out completely). The chimney was knocked over once and the supports get broken every year. Is there any way to avoid this or prevent the breaking. It is dangerous and also has led to animals getting in through the hole in the roof. Can we have no sewer stack - just a hole with a cover in the roof? Is there a better way to protect the chimney without moving it?
Guest User
4/3/2004
One option would be snowguards or a snowfence on the area above the pipes, alonmg with strengthening yor strapping or supports for the pipes as best as possible. Another option would be to actually construct a dormer uphill from the pipes, directing the snow far off to the sides of them.
Guest User
4/3/2004
One option would be snowguards or a snowfence on the area above the pipes, along with strengthening your strapping or supports for the pipes as best as possible. Another option would be to actually construct a dormer uphill from the pipes, directing the snow far off to the sides of them.
Guest User
4/4/2004
I found an article from the Army's environmental engineering section on the subject and wrote to the author about my problem. His response is different than Todd's: "Your best solution would be reroute the vent within your attic from a location near the eaves to a location near the ridge. If you don't have an attic, consider boxing around the rerouted pipe. Vents through the roof should be located near the ridge. I would not recommend cutting your pipe as it may not vent properly under all that snow and ice." I wonder if any of this is practical. I could also exit the pipe at the fascia under the eaves.
Guest User
4/4/2004
Moving the pipe closer to the ridge is a good idea. There may be some local building codes pertaining to the maximum amount of re-routing which can be done to it. I am not sure if the pipe is a fan exhaust or simply the plumbing vent. However, I do not think re-routing it to the soffit is a good idea. The chimney pipe, I assume, cannot be re-routed.
Guest User
5/9/2005
We just got our bill for $199 to replace our boiler venting pipe that was collapsed in half by ice and snow. Also our sink vent is tipped and in need of repair. We love our green metal roof but there must be something manufactured by the roofing companies to prevent this problem.
Guest User
5/9/2005
We live in northern Wisconsin and have new metal roof. We had to have our chimney vent replaced as the snow crushed it. Neither the roofing company or heating company have a solution. Can't keep replacing the chimney......
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
5/9/2005
It must be that the penetrations are lower on the roof and it sounds like you have some heat loss that is causing the snow to melt and freeze. I would then make sure that the ridge and eave have been ventilated properly and then in this case it is best to install a snow diverter that will V the snow/ice around the pipes.
Guest User
8/29/2008
Hi - I have just experienced the same thing - the chimney pipe from our wood stove was sheared off and the pipe below was folded shut. This is on the outside wall and is close to the edge of the roof. We replaced the roof last fall with a very nice metal roof. This is in a vacation home and wasn't discovered until now in a very rainy summer. So far just a mess and a wet carpet. Did you find a solution? Suggestions were for a v-shaped diverter but no help in how to construct one. Hope you solved it and can help me. Thanks.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
8/31/2008
You may want to look into this product: http://www.snoblox-snojax.com/metal-roof-snow-guard/snow-guards-8.html
Guest User
10/9/2008
We bought the snojax and the new contractor I've discussed this with says it's too small to make much of a difference. Ugh... here's what's been happening: The wood stove pipe is approx. 28 feet from the peak of the standing seam roof and about 8 feet from the bottom; the problem is all 3 winters since adding standing seam we have dealt with leaks and breaks around the pipe (last winter the wood stove pipe tore off and crashed with an avalanche). The roofing contractor has done small things to only procrastinate the problem. He also told me that I should have told a contractor to build up sort of a V behind the pipe before he put the roof in. HELP! Is there some type of ‘pyramid’ that can be added to the roof (rather than tear up and start that area over) to divert snow/ice away from the pipe? We put standing seam in so we wouldn’t have to shovel snow. I’m a little concerned about another contractor’s recommendation to put a series of rails in—due to the accumulative snow build up and weight on this contemporary designed house. Shoveling is dangerous in the winter! Any ideas? THANKS!
Guest User
3/28/2009
Hi Todd, are you there? I just got back from Spokane, this installer from a stove shop just told me how he sold and installed a new wood stove assembly. This last Christmas the snow bent the chimney and ripped a huge hole in the roof. Since they never offered the customer (what he calls a Snow Wedge) they ended up fixing everything at their own expense! Now when a customer has them install a new stove chimney they will make them sign a waiver, if they decline protection. So far no one has declined protection. Well I guess lesson learned….. Anyway, I want to thank your writers for using the Snow Terminator in there standard snow zone roof installation packages. We also want you to know that on Tuesday 4/7/09 we will be introducing the new ST02! 50% bigger than the ST01. Specially designed from “popular request” to accommodate our stove vendors in mega snow zones! If you haven’t seen our website its www.snowterminator.com Contractors please don’t bother purchasing from the website. You will save much more buying direct from our ROLLED STEEL, HVAC or WOOD STOVE vendors. If you have one or more showrooms and haven’t received your free ST01 displays let us know and I will get them to you. Thank You! Bryan Marlow 208.756.7633 [email protected]
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
3/29/2009
Thanks Bryan.
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