Protrusion (nail?) under panel

Guest User
10/12/2017
Hi, My 6 year old metal roof had cosmetic damage from a big hail storm here last year, and a Dallas area roofing company came by and said they could replace it and my insurance would pay. Now that they've started the job, I was surprised to see about 15 spots (all on the back - none visible from the road) where it appears that panels were laid over protruding nails - see photo, please. My last roof did not have any pointy high spots like this, to my knowledge. To me, this simply looks like sloppy work by someone who didn't make sure the deck was smooth before installing the metal. What I'd like to know is, how series an issue this is. Could the movement of the roof over time possibly puncture the metal? It looks like if a heavy tree branch fell on it, or if someone stepped on it, that it could possibly puncture the metal. It's certainly a cosmetic defect, and that was the only reason I had the original roof replaced to begin with. Does this condition affect the value of my roof, or worse, void my warranty? After I've pointed this out, the roofing crew manager has said they'll take care of it and replace the necessary panels. But he and the salesman have both tried to minimize the situation. The manager only counted 3 places, and the salesman told me that it was just a co-incidence that there are none of these pointy high spots that are visible from the front, back or street side of the house (I'm on a corner). Those sides look perfect. But the opposite side of the house and the garage is where the problems are, and I am convinced that the deck prep was not thorough in those areas. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks, Ben
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
10/12/2017
It won't puncture the metal but it could rub through the back of the metal and create a rusting spot. What type of underlayment did they use?
Ben Owen
10/17/2017
Hey Eric, Thanks for responding. I registered after sending this question, so I didn't get notified that you'd answered. They used Summit 60, which went down on old 1x6 shiplap (house was built in the 30's). The synthetic paper that was already on from the last roof was an ice blue color, but I don't have the name. What is the trade name for this type of defect, please? I'm still waiting to learn if the panels will be replaced, like they told me. This weekend I documented which panels have this defect, and it's a bunch - 36 of the 88 panels, or partial panels on the garage or backside of the house. Again, they did a good prep job on the decking on the front and back of the house and the side that faces the road. That paneling all looks great. It's the same shiplap under that good work. The last roof showed no defects of this type, to my knowledge. I'm concerned that if they don't fix the underlayment and replace the panels, I'll have traded hail stone defects for poor prep work defects that may actually be worse than what I started with. Thanks much for your help, Ben
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
10/17/2017
This is not a defect in the panel. It appears (based on the size) to be a nail from either the cap nail on the underlayment or an old nail from the shiplap decking that is pushing back up. If its a nail from the decking, it should have the protection from the underlayment between the nail and the metal. Might be visually off putting but it should be fine from a functional standpoint.
Ben Owen
10/21/2017
Hey Eric, Finally got the guys to take off a panel and check out the decking. Turns out that when the shingles were torn off before the previous standing seam roof was put on, in spots there were bits of shingle material around a nail that didn't get cleaned off. This had been covered over by now two layers of synthetic underlayment. The only reason I can imagine why these nails didn't telegraph thru the previous metal roof is that those panels were darker and had two "stripes" formed into them to prevent oil canning. They were also screwed in and the new ones are clipped in. I've been assured that the current panels are 24 gauge, same as the last ones. At any rate, the roofers removed and replaced about 30 panels, so hats off to them. They weren't too happy about it, but they should not have assumed that the previous crew prepped the decking correctly (which they did do on the parts of the house that showed from the street.) Thanks for your assistance in helping me understand the problem. Ben
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
10/21/2017
Ben, That is great news. Sounds like the guys were a really stand up crew and you are right....there is no fun in tearing off good roofing material so I feel their pain there. Thanks for the updates.

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