Brad C
8/27/2017
Hi, I have read some of the forum posts already regarding 3:12 roofs and wanted to ask a few clarifying questions of "the experts" :) 1. We reside in SW Montana, and are in between two mountain ranges that funnel south (narrow) to north (wide) and thus cause extensive winds in the winter months. 30-40 is about average from our weather stations readings over the past 7 years. Are metal roofs good for this type of wind? 2. If they are acceptable for this type of wind, are there any caveats to installing them for this type of environment? 3. What is the minimum gauge you would recommend for a metal roof in SW Montana? 4. I plan on doing the installation myself as the contractors in my area want an excessive amount just to come out to my place because it is so rural (we're 20 miles from the nearest town (population 500) and 70 miles to the nearest large town (Bozeman, MT 100k population). Any pointers would be appreciated. 5. What is the best approach to handling vents and the chimney? An other insight from the experts would be GREATLY appreciated! TIA! Brad in SW Montana
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
8/28/2017
All things considered, my suggestion in this case would probably be a 28 or heavier gauge through-fastened panel. This is based upon the relentless winds, potential for snow, roof pitch, etc. The only contractor I know personal and can recommend is Beartooth Metal Roofing out of Billings. I realize they are a ways from you but I think they are accustomed to traveling. The manufacturer of the roofing you choose should have instructions for various roof penetrations ... it will be important to follow their instructions.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
8/28/2017
Todd is spot on. 28 would be the minimum in my book. Contact a reputable local company and see what they recommend in you application. I prefer a hidden fastener myself, but exposed fasteners are used quite often and are very proven when installed properly. If you are talking about venting in terms of bath vents, you can run those to the gable end wall and vent through the siding if possible.
Brad C
8/28/2017
Thanks for the responses. Here is a little more information in pasteboard.co pictures; in case that helps at all. https://pasteboard.co/GHG1hWy.jpg https://pasteboard.co/GHG1uCU.jpg https://pasteboard.co/GHG1ES0.jpg https://pasteboard.co/GHG1NDE.png https://pasteboard.co/GHG1YJ7.png
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
8/28/2017
Brad, I certainly agree with Eric that overall I prefer hidden fastener. I am just thinking of the relentless, punishing winds this roof will endure and, in light of that, I suggested exposed fastener. However, overall, you will likely have a shorter roof life with exposed fastener versus concealed.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
8/28/2017
+1. Both with work here. Didn't want to come off as contrarian to Todd as he has probably forgotten more about metal than I have ever known. Whichever way you go, metal will definitely work here and those bath fans could be run out the side of the home if you want to clean up the roof penetrations and keep it to a minimum. Its pretty close so the reach isn't an issue. You could probably combine those plumbing vents in the attic and have one penetration if that works better as well. How bad are the winds out there?

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