Is 24 Gauge considered "light gauge"

Monica Adams
5/2/2017
Hi. I have previously posted about my severely oil canned roof. Now we at the stage of meeting with corporate for the builder and metal company to sort this out. The roof installed is a 24 gauge 16" standing seam. The oil canning disclaimer on the metal company's site says it can happen with "light gauge metal". So my question is if 24 gauge is not considered "light gauge", then why did it happen. After the metal company rep confirmed that this is actually a pretty heavy gauge, their corporate back peddled and said actually 24 gauge IS considered light in the realm of all metal products. This company really seems to lack integrity. Can an expert please tell me if 24 is considered "light gauge"? I feel like they are jerking me around because no one wants to take the blame. The 2 estimators that came out both said it looks like an installation problem. They also both pointed out that all the vents that are installed right on top of the panels are wrong. The builder says this is the way they install them, so I have to live with it. I'm getting a new roof one way or another.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
5/2/2017
The steel industry will consider any rolled steel that can be easily fabricated to be "light gauge" ... this definition could easily go as thick as 12 gauge or even thicker. Where the confusion enters in is that, of the thicknesses commonly used for steel roofing, 24 gauge is on the heaver end but still considered to be "light gauge" by the steel industry.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
5/2/2017
+1 Light in the steel world, heavier on the roofing steel world.
Monica Adams
5/2/2017
Hi, thank you. The issue I have is that this oil canning disclaimer stating that it can happen on light gauge metal, is on their metal roofing installation guide. So one would think when told by the company that 24 gauge is NOT considered light gauge, that their disclaimer is wrong. I'm also surprised that we never had to sign anything and were not even warned that this could happen. I guess the builders are sending people by our house and telling them this can happen to you. That doesn't seem like the most professional or smart way to go about it. In some light and when it is very wet, you can hardly see the oil canning. This may end up coming back to bite them!

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