Modifications to metal roof

Guest User
4/10/2017
Im going to install a gulfcoast supply versalok metal roof. This is a standing seam mechanically sealed hidden fastener roof approved for High Velocity Hurricane Zones (HVHZ), including Miami-Dade. My goal is to hurricane proof my home with one of the strongest metal roofs available. I am also doing other things to my home to make it very strong against winds. Those other things are outside the scope of this thread. On my gulfcoast supply versalok roof I had previously decided to omit the gable rake cleats and eave flashing cleats. The only purpose of the cleats is to continue the hidden faster design. To avoid having panel seams that intersect the vent boots and the chimney, Im starting at one edge with a partial width panel. Im thinking of cutting this panel several inches wider then needed and folding that edge down and screwing it to my fascia. Therefore not needed the gable rake. Please look at the images below and this company gable rake install video here: https://vimeopro.com/gulfcoastsupply/standing-seam/video/52086299 thoughts? pa
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/10/2017
You will want to wrap the underlayment over the edge of the roof. Doing this with the end panel will likely force ripples into the panel which may not be real attractive.
Guest User
4/11/2017
Why would it force ripples? The panels im buying do have striations. Why is there a BIG green button blocking this web page? If offers "Find a contractor near your home". It's blocking reading and scrolling this forum posts and replys. I can't possibly understand why someone would do that. Maybe "Hey, let's make it real big and put it in the way of using the page, maybe that will attract more ppl to click on it. Great idea, go for it"? I tried the other day to reply to my post with images. Here: Images: https://imgur.com/a/84Bh0 pa
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/11/2017
I am sorry to hear about the green button ... I will look into that. On my screen, it's very small. Any time you try to fold a panel length wise like that, and then add fasteners as well, it is very easy to end up with stresses in the metal that cause ripples. Additionally, the fasteners in the fascia will not allow the panels to expand and contract with temperature changes and that will also cause the metal to have to go somewhere, which usually means ripples. Do you have some sort of brake long enough to bend the panels all atone? That will be helpful of course.
Guest User
4/11/2017
good points. The pancake screws that hold the original design ZF 15 Z flashing and the gable cleat would stop the expansion same, right? yes bending the entire 14" 10" panel length might be tricky. Im still thinking about this. We have no brake that long. My only idea is to use the edge of the gable fascia and push down on the panel over that. The 1st time pushing downwards (maybe with a roller) and across the length of the panel would just be making a crease. we would need to go over it several times; each time folding it down a little more. Until we got the full 90° fold. Unless someone has a better idea(me do hope). My green button takes more the 10% of my horizontal screen space and repeats what is already on the page top menu. pa
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/11/2017
You might be able to find a sheet metal shop with a long brake that can bend this ... Yes, a Z Cleat gable design also keeps the metal from moving ... and if not done very carefully can also cause problems. There is the option with that detail of using a slotted hole in the panel to help allow for movement. You could perhaps do that on the gable as well.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
4/11/2017
+1 to Todd's feedback. That panel will need to grow and move. Looks like you are hitting both the boards.
Guest User
4/11/2017
I had thought about slotted screw holes when watching the video. However, since the manufacturer just self taps the screws thru the metal, I figured that might be best. Yes finding a shop with a 15' brake might be the best way. Panels that snap onto each other allow for expansion. however panels that are mechanically seamed to each other, cant, right? Thanks for your replies Todd, but why do I get no other replies? Whenever I post questions about anything, including gardening or fixing my truck, I like to get thoughts and ideas from as many ppl as possible. Not that any one is smarter then the others, just that the more ideas, the more variety of solutions, the better. pa
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/11/2017
The ability to expand and contract has more to do with how they are affixed to the structure than to each other. The expert volunteers tend to take turns on answering questions ... unless we really feel we have something to add that is different than what has already been said.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
4/11/2017
Here is the second picture. https://www.metalroofing.com/v2/forums/uploads/attachments/original%20gable%20rake.jpg
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
4/11/2017
Attached
Guest User
4/11/2017
Are there any other forum sites where I can get other inputs? p
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
4/11/2017
You are pretty much at the industry center of metal roofing here. What other input did you need? Can it be done...yes. Do you need some specialty tools to make it looking right in my opinion....also yes. You can bend the thing down and screw it down all you want, but it might not look that good and you don't float the screws and slot the panels, it is going to bind up and bend up in those locations. He doesn't do it on the clip for the rake channel because it is hidden and will not matter if it gets a bit twisted as the finished surface (the rake panel) is clipped into a lock that allows it to grow directional. My concern is about the lack of a finished look out of it if you do it without putting the panel on a break or using a bending tool of some sort.
Paul M
4/25/2017
I think I found a better method. See image. Your thoughts?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/25/2017
If you have a way of making a nice bend like that along the entire length of the panels, this can work. Depending upon your rafter length, the ability to do that can be difficult. This is how flared gables are typically handled -- that is, situations where the ridge of the roof is wider than the eave.
Guest User
4/25/2017
15' so what hand tool would I need?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/25/2017
You can try to do this gradually with as long of a flanging tool as you can find. Chances are that will be 24" at the longest. That won't be easy to do without forcing ripples into the panel. Ideally, you'd find someone with a 15'+ pressbrake or handbrake and have them bend these panels for you. That will not unfortunately be an easy beast to find. Sorry.
Guest User
4/25/2017
7' longest brake i can find locally, with a min shop charge of 400$. I posted a new thread last night. It has yet to be approved. Was it lost? Its title was "Rivets why?"
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/25/2017
Not sure what happened ... I did answer the question online. Here's my reply: Rivets will sometimes be used to connect two pieces of metal together and secure them. Screws will usually be used to secure the metal to the structure. It all depends upon what is needing to be done. Rivets can allow for continued thermal movement of the metal whereas screws can cause the metal to ripple with temperature changes. David Stermer's reply: Also, in my experience, rivet heads are much smaller, less noticeable and will not back out.

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