Monica Adams
4/5/2017
Hi, I need advice. We are having a home built by a builder here in WA. We did the upgrade to a 24 gauge with pencil rib metal roof. It was a big upgrade for us, and we loved the way they look. So the builders are slow and only have one team of venders to do all the work. The wooden sheeting was put on with Tyvek cover, but it was winter and it ripped and got soaked. It was also freezing at times. That was exposed 2 weeks before the metal roofing went on. As soon as it was up, we noticed peaks and valleys. Find out it was oil canning. The roofers got it done in less than a week. By the time we noticed it, they were gone. We notified the builder. It took a while, but finally they got a rep from the metal company to come out. He just said right away "sorry, it just happens sometimes ". He didn't give us any possible reasons why it happened. That was 3 months ago. I've been emailing with the metal company and the builders. No one wants to take responsibility, and they are mostly just ignoring me. The oil canning is extreme and very unsightly. I had a reputable roofing company give me an official inspection. He could tell that it was most likely the roofing company, which is tiny. No website even. Not sure if it can be unfastened and refastened, or are the peaks and valleys permanent? And who is ultimately responsible? We still owe the builder a final payment. Is it unreasonable to hold it back until this is resolved? I've filed a complaint with the AG's consumer protection division. Not sure what else to do!
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
4/6/2017
On this website, under "Other" you can find an industry document on this subject: http://www.metalconstruction.org/Tech-Resources There is a chance that the decking had warped and that is a cause of this. However, it could be other things as well. If you find the ripples to be unsightly (and it sound like you do), I would press the manufacturer to help you in determining the root cause. Some panels will likely need to be removed to do that. Once the root cause is discovered, then a plan of action for remedy can be developed. Removing and re-installing the panels may be an option ... it just depends upon what has caused this.
Guest User
4/6/2017
Finally after 3 months of complaining and getting the AG's office involved, the builder and metal company have decided they will have a roofer pull up some panels, lay down a foam backer, and reattach the panels to reduce the oil canning. I have no idea if this will work, but it's probably a lot cheaper than a complete replacement.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
4/7/2017
Running some foam backer rod down the length is a pretty tried and true way of mitigating oil-canning. Keep us posted on the results.
Guest User
4/19/2017
I have a foam backer update! It didn't help. At all. In fact, it's almost worse looking. They only did 4 panels in front and it actually just looks PUFFY, but still dented and oil canned. I told them this was NOT a good solution. Then they actually suggested that in the front, they replace with a more narrow panel, and leave the 16" panels in the back! I said no way. I think we are going to ask for 10% of the build cost, which is a bit over 20k. To us, this reflects the depreciation of value in the home, and we MIGHT be able to find a roofer that won't charge us 30k for a replacement. It's just a shame that building a brand new home has become a stressful fight. And still, no one is taking responsibility. But I think ultimately it falls on the builder.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
4/19/2017
Sorry to hear about that Monica. Sounds like a combination of weather and other contributing factors made for a bad installation and finished product. Did the panel or coil manufacturer weigh in on this?
Guest User
4/19/2017
Hi Eric. The rep for the metal company reluctantly came to the house and just shook his head and said "it just happens". He really didn't even look at it. He never tried to figure out WHY it happened. We never signed a waiver, and neither did our builder at the possibility of oil canning. There is a small disclaimer on their installation guide. The builder's corporate is going back and forth with them, but they refuse to do anything to rectify the problem. That's why I contacted the AG, but now my builder is upset about it. So I'm kinda st my wits end.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
4/19/2017
I hope, given the option to fix it vs. fight about it, that cooler heads will prevail from the supplier and installer.
Guest User
7/13/2017
After many months of fighting about this severely oil canned roof, Lexar Homes has made 3 offers. 1) replace only in the front area that you can see from the yard using a fastening system (They said if they were making a bigger profit on our home, they would replace the whole thing) 2) replace with a composite roof 3) 5k cash (it was a 9k upgrade) We are not sure what to do. None of these offers are sufficient. And they have basically admitted that their roofer "overtightened" the screws causing it to oil can. When the differ was asked about it, he said he'd give us the address to 10 other homes he's done that have all oul canned. Apparently, this is normal to him! He also said he can't afford to buy us a new roof because he has 4 kids to feed. The unprofessionalism of both the builder and the roofer are very disheartening. I really wish we'd picked a builder who would stand behind their work, like it says in the contract.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
7/15/2017
I don't think there is anything about that roof that would make me want to use asphalt. If you drive around the historic village near my home, the oil canning that you have pictured would be the norm if not slightly less than normal on the newly replaced roofs in these parts. I 100% understand your frustration with wanting it to look perfect and a far less oil canned roof is possible at the end of the day. Only you can say what you will be happy with, but I would never replace that roof with asphalt and as long as it was fundamentally installed correctly...you never should have to either.

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