Metal roof on dog house

Guest User
3/8/2017
Looking to install a single pitched metal roof (two 26 gauge 3' x 8' panels) on a 4' x 4' doghouse with an open door offset to one side and a vent in the upper rear for cross ventilation. Intend to have a 6' x 8' roof extend 1' over on the sides and back, and 3' over in the front for a shaded area. What is the best way to insulate and install the roof? Plywood, OSB, or 2x4 frame? Purlins or solid deck? Insulation between purlins or directly on plywood above or below? Felt where? Trying to ensure longest life out of materials as possible. Thank you!
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
3/8/2017
I think simplicity is your friend here. Are you going to be heating the dog house in the winter months or just looking to keep the radiant heat out of the structure in the summer months? What color roof are you going with?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
3/8/2017
My suggestion. From the inside out: "ceiling", insulation, vented airspace, plywood decking, underlayment, metal roof
Guest User
3/8/2017
Thank you for the responses. Simplicity makes sense to me. For the record, I am building this house with and for my nephew, who is recently out on his own and now has two dogs. The mail goal is to keep radiant heat out in summer months, as it gets pretty hot here in South Mississippi and we are warm most of the year. The vent will be closable and the house used during the majority of our fairly mild winters as well, but the dogs will be brought inside when the weather dips really low a handful of times each year. We were just planning to use plain galvanized/silver as far as color. Todd, that is very interesting. From my reading, I was thinking it should be, from the inside out: "ceiling", insulation, OSB, underlayment, purlins (which would provide vented airspace), metal roof. In the order you provided, would you suggest capping or filing the ends of the corrugations or ridges in the metal roof? If not there will essentially be another vented air space above the underlayment, but I guess that would be ok? Thanks again. I know we are over thinking this but I have wood working experience and virtually no roofing experience!
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
3/8/2017
Silver will definitely help with heat rejection vs. a darker color. I would look at some above deck venting as Todd mentioned and look at some foil based foams that incorporate a radiant barrier on them to help with the heat rejection. You will need to screen off the vent space and run the closures for the corrugated metal. The screening will go on the vent space that you create.
Guest User
3/9/2017
We are using 3/4" foil backed foam in the walls and floor and had planned to use it in the ceiling as well. Is the screening of the vent space to keep out pests/wasps/ dirt daubers, etc?
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
3/10/2017
Yes. Screening to keep out all the critters.
Guest User
3/13/2017
Thanks so much for the help and information, guys. We have reworked the design and I have attached a rough schematic based on your advice, as least how I understand it. We will use spray foam in a can to close the ends of the corrugations (at the left and right ends of the schematic) if we can't get a foam sealing strip from the metal roofing manufacturer for this purpose. We will use synthetic underlayment that will wrap 1/2" CDX on both ends. We'll use 1x4's (that will attach to runners on either side as well the front and rear of the house that are not pictured) to create a small open vent space that is screened on the sides. Under that will be 3/4" foam insulation, with foil side up. We may be able to get two layers in there depending on some other design issues, over the plywood ceiling. Did I leave anything out? Any major errors or things that need to be considered? This has all been a real learning experience and I am looking forward to putting this knowledge to use on some other larger projects in the near future. Thanks again.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
3/13/2017
Looks good but how are you planning on moving air if the 1x4's are flat against the plywood and foam? They need to be cross battened to get an airspace.
Guest User
3/14/2017
I was going to leave the space between the 1 x 4's (white in the image) open/vented to either side (except for screening for pests), but I understand that hot air rises and moving it vertically up the roof would be preferred. I could add another level of 1x4's for a cross battened design. Should the open areas (again white in image) be closed to the sides and only open on the low and high ends (left and right in the image) so that air flows along the path of the arrows shown? Or would extra venting on either side also be advantageous?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
3/15/2017
Yes, I feel you need the vertical air movement ... and I would close off any access to air from the sides.

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