john tschogl
1/15/2017
Hello- I had recently a roof-over done on a mobile home using .024 aluminum coil. The coil is painted on the surface with baked acrylic enamel. The installer did many things which I am questioning. One of them is: bent, then straightened, then re-bent the thin aluminum. Could the aluminum be damaged by this? ) 1-He bent the roof down over one side of the roof, forming a 4 inch long leg, and attached it on that side of the mobile home with J-channel along the edge. (40 screws into the j-metal along that edge) He neglected to install any flashing for installation of a rain gutter along that side. 2- Then later, he installed a rain gutter along the wall BELOW that j-channel, using silicone caulking behind the rain gutter and more silicone caulking between the bottom of the j-channel and the top of the rain gutter back edge (where it met the wall). Needless to say, a water test showed it leaked like a sieve behind the gutter and down the wall. 3.- Then he unscrewed the 40 screws, removed the j-metal, bent the aluminum roofing back up, installed flashing under the roof that went over into the rain gutter, and re-attached the j-channel into the side of the mobile home with 40 longer screws. The aluminum at the bend is misshapen in many places and has numerous flat spots along was a nice curved 90 degree bend before all the re-working. Could all of the bending and re-bending have damaged the aluminum with pinholes or cracks that are not visible to the naked eye? I'm concerned about slight leaks that won't immediately be noticed but will cause much damage over the long term. Thanks for any advice you can give. John Tschogl [email protected]
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
1/15/2017
My feeling / experience are that any cracks which may have been caused will be visible.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
1/16/2017
Without knowing more about the material specifically and how it was bent, it is tough to say for certain how the materials have been impacted. That being said, nothing about what has been done there looks good and I would suspect there are a multitude of issues that go above and beyond just the bending of the materials and many of them you have noted in your description.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
1/16/2017
Oh ... I just now saw the attached image. Sorry. I tend to agree with Eric. I am curious about other aspects of the installation.
Guest User
1/19/2017
Thank You Todd and Eric for your answers. To Todd: There's a whole basket of wrongs with this roof installation. I'll fill you in on all the details after it goes to arbitration next month, but in general it was the contractors failure to pay attention to manufacturers installation instructions; not adhering to contract specs; failing to follow code; and poor workmanship.(gee, is that all? lol) Almost $3000. of listed corrections by an Industry Expert on a roof, skylight and rain gutter that cost a total of $8100. (contractor not paid yet) I'd just like to stress the importance to other forum readers-- of taking plenty of photos before, during, and after work they have done, as this has been essential in getting us into arbitration. I do have two questions about the thin .024 aluminum though. 1.) Once the aluminum is bent (as in the photo I attached last time), is there a technical explaination as to why it should not be unbent, or straightened (does the initial bend harden the aluminum at the bend)? 2.) when attaching two pieces of the thin .024 aluminum to each other along a long seam (at the ridge) are there special screws to use?, and a particular length of screw that should be used ?. Contractor used 1 1/4 inch truss head lath screws, (apparently into nothing but rigid foam insulation. Should there be 2x4's running along each side of the ridge to anchor the screws? The seam is really loose and wavy. Much Thanks John T.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
1/20/2017
In terms of the bending and re-bending of aluminum, it does have a finite amount of flexibility that it can accommodate before it begins to crack. Totally depend on how it is bent as well (i.e. with what type of tools). Screws should anchor into the deck and should be a gasket equip screw.

If you would like to reply to this thread, please log in. If you do not have an Ask the Experts forum user account, create one here.

Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.