Transition flashing needed?

Guest User
1/6/2017
I'm trying to get a leak fixed where standing seam metal roofing installed on a curved eyebrow roof section meets a singled section on the main roof. It's pretty high up and someone took a picture with a drone so I was finally able to see what it looks like and it doesn't look pretty to me. It seems there should have been some type of transition flashing installed where the roof lines meet. You can see where water stands on the metal roofing and where someone tried to resolve the issue by using some type of sealant, which failed. It seems that the standing seam roof shouldn't be butted directly against the shingle roof and that any transition section should be open, and visible?, to allow the water to drain. A local roofer has recommended removing the metal roof and installing with the seams perpendicular to the way they're installed now. I'm wondering if that's going to resolve the issue and also guessing that some sort of transition flashing would be required. I'd appreciate any suggestions that could be provided. Thanks, Brian.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
1/6/2017
Very difficult area. A transition flashing would have been great but making a curved flashing would be difficult. Opening this up for other ideas.
Guest User
1/6/2017
Is there any slope on the metal ? If it's ponding and backing up there it seems like a bad design. Hard to tell from that one picture
Dick Bus
1/7/2017
there are several problems with this installation. the standing seam is installed the wrong direction, the water needs to drain. there appears to be no valley flashing. I doubt there is peel and stick underlayment. contact me at [email protected] and I will provide you some names of contractors that have done this type of installation in your area.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
1/9/2017
That thing is a mess. Hope the Mr. Bus can send you some good names to get this figured out for you.
Guest User
1/9/2017
Thanks for the response, sorry I didn't get any notifications for replies and forgot to check back. There is very little slope there that I'm aware of, I'm trying to get my hands on the building specs for this and am still waiting to get them. I'll update when I can get it.... B.
Guest User
1/9/2017
Dick, thank you for your response as well, sorry to take so long to reply. I agree, there are several issues apparent to me and I'm not a roofing installer, but I can certainly tell there should be a valley for transition there and that the roofing types shouldn't butt into each other. I agree that there is no valley flashing at all and most likely no adequate underlayment either unfortunately. I've been trying to figure out what else the roofer who attempted the patch with that sealant also put near the transition. It almost looks like some type of cloth, maybe fiberglass or ???? who knows. I only know it didn't work and that any roofer should have been able to tell that installation wasn't done correctly and told us that instead of saying he "thought" he could patch it, but wouldn't "guarantee the outcome". I know why that is... :-( We've got a few roofers that are supposed to be working on estimates for repair and we're waiting to see what they propose. I know one did mention turning the metal roofing the other way, but I'm still concerned about the transition between the 2 roofs. I appreciate your offer for contacts and will email you for folks in the area to compare against folks who have done past work and who are working on estimates. It certainly can't hurt to get more ideas for repair and estimates. B.

If you would like to reply to this thread, please log in. If you do not have an Ask the Experts forum user account, create one here.

Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.