Guest User
1/29/2004
I LIVE IN CENTRAL NEW YORK STATE. WE ARE CURRENTLY RECEIVING GREAT AMOUNTS OF LAKE EFFECT SNOW. HOW MUCH SNOW CAN A METAL ROOF WITHSTAND BEFORE IT SHOULD BE CLEARED? THANK YOU IN ADVANCE. JOYCE BROSNAN
Guest User
1/29/2004
We recently renovated/expanded our home and replaced the very old slate shingles with architectural shingles. We have one low-pitched area where we have experienced ice damming and therefore dripping back into the house. The contractor installed 3 feet of ice and weather shield but that does not seem to be working as the snow melts and still drips. Would replacing the existing (albeit new) roof with a metal roof help solve our situation? The pitch, according to the contractor, is a 3:1 (?) pitch, not sure if that means anything except that it is not very steep. Thanks.
Guest User
1/29/2004
The metal roof itself should withstand any weightload which your structure can withstand. Trying to clear snow from the roof could damage the roof. I would generally advise against it. If you have any problems with ice damming along the eaves of the roof, you should consider increasing the ventilation through your attic.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
1/29/2004
Roof pitch is normally referred to as being rise over run. Usually, the run is 12 as a standard. Therefore, as example, 3:12 pitch would mean 3' of vertical rise for every 12' of run horizontal. Most metal roofs for residential application require a 3:12 pitch. I am guessing your roof is lower than that pitch. 3:12 is also required for asphalt shingles. I would never suggest using any roof at lower than its minimum pitch. There are some standing seam roofs which can be used at 2:12. I would suggest determining your roof pitch and then investigating standing seam options if appropriate.
Guest User
3/27/2004
I have a house boat that I would like to make a snow sheding over roof to erect in the winter and remove in the summer. Do you have suggestions for the pitch, surface texture and framing suggestions. The roof area is 50 X 15 feet. Thanks
Guest User
4/18/2004
We have had problems with ice dams on our asphalt shingle roof and are considering replacing the roof with a metal roof if this would reduce ice dam issues and allow us to elimate the need for installing heat tape on the roof. What is the required pitch to reliably shed snow from a metal roof? Is heat tape ever necessary on a metal roof? Are there ice dam problems on metal roofs? Thank you.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
4/20/2004
Your home is probably experiencing heat loss and possibly ventilation problems and you should identify the source of the problem and have it corrected. While smooth metal will shed the snow, ice can still form and lock on at the eaves and valleys. My famous quote is that a metal roof will help treat the symtoms but you do need to correct the source of the problem. It could be that you need more ventilation and more insulation to stop the heat loss and it may be in conjunction with a lower slope roof or valley intersection. Choose a metal roofing contractor and explain your problems and have him have a look. It could be that installing some ice and water sheild in the critical areas at the eaves and valleys coupled with increased ventilation and a metal roof designed to have vertical air flow under it will resolve it. Hope this helps.
Guest User
4/27/2004
Our roof sheds snow, but we need to break up the avalances above entrances. Any suggestions?
Guest User
4/27/2004
There are a number of snowguard and snowfence systems available for this purpose. Check with your roofing manufacturer or do an internet search for these products and the manufacturers of these products will help you determine what is appropriate for your roof and home.
Guest User
4/28/2004
i also have ice dams. but i have a 8ft unheated overhang,I have proper vents at every opening and 12 inches of insulation, but i noticed that there is kraft faced insulation and poly under the drywall could that be a problem,i was always taught one or the other not both..is that true??..do you think a metal roof would help...thanks
Guest User
4/29/2004
I would reinvestigate the airflow through your vents. You may have vents but they may not be located in ways which encourages airflow across the bottom of the roof deck and throughout the attic. Also, I am concerned that this might be a low pitch roof area (?) which perhaps has a larger roof above it dumping a lot of snow on it. The smooth surface of metal will likely help a lot but may not completely end this situation in all weather conditions and scenarios.
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