Guest User
8/14/2016
A subcontractor installed an exposed fastener metal panel roof on my home in April 2015 (Everlast II Omni series). The installation was sloppy and I started getting water stains on my ceilings immediately. Pre-installation details: I have a 1971 10x60 mobile home with a 14x50 stick-built addition on the south side and a 12x20 sunroom addition on the north side. Originally there was a flat roof over the mobile home and south side addition. At some point a shingled 4:12 gable roof was built over the flat roof. The flat roof is still intact under the gable roof and serves as the attic floor. The ceilings are insulated but it appears that there has never been any insulation in the attic. There is a low sloped roof (2:12 I believe) built off of the gable roof, over the sunroom. The gable roof is vented via gable vents and continuous soffit vents. When I bought the house, the roof leaked at the transition from the gable roof to low-sloped roof. The sunroom is enclosed from the rest of the house by walls and a steel entry door but is open to the attic. There were no other leaks in the house. I’ve owned this home for 4 years. Installation details: The metal panels were installed over 1x3 furring strips placed horizontally every 2 feet from the eaves to ridge. The existing shingles were saturated when the metal roof was installed. (Installation began the end of March in Pennsylvania, plus the materials sat in my yard, unprotected from the rain throughout the installation.) The subs workmanship was non-conforming. No underlayment was installed and very few of the basic manufacturer installation guidelines were followed. Some of the obvious errors include: The panel overlaps face predominate wind direction, no closures installed at eaves, ridge cap closures were installed OUTSIDE of the ridge cap, some panels are too short at the eaves and lay flush with the drip edge, some portions of drip edge were installed OVER the gutter hangers, many panels are bowing/buckling, many “lifetime” fasteners are loose and many appear to be over-tightened since they indent the panel. The most obvious problem is that the chimney wasn’t sealed properly and water was leaking into the attic for about 6 months. Water stains began to form on the ceiling throughout the area where the chimney is located, with separate stains as far as 20 feet away. A friend tried to caulk the chimney to mitigate damage until it could be repaired. The water stains continue to worsen and new stains have formed, even now, 16 months after install and 10 months after my friend caulked the chimney. I have water stains on every ceiling in every room. Mold is forming on the walls too. This leads me to suspect that something else, other than the chimney leak, is causing moisture. My house is like a sauna. The indoor air was damp in the winter too. My energy costs have increased. Since the flat roof is intact, I assume it would still need vented. And I assume the flat roof ventilation system is separate from the gable roof ventilation system. Was the flat roof ventilation system somehow obstructed when the subcontractor installed the metal roof? The mold smell is horrible and I am very sick. Everyone that comes to my house gets sick. Why is the water damage occurring? Maybe it’s the combination of multiple problems? I’m trying to figure this out but I’m not a contractor or engineer. I have a degree in psychology. So the only things I’m sure of are that the contractor and sub are incompetent and shifty and my house is slowly falling apart. Even the vinyl siding is warping and coming loose at the seams. I had major ice dams on the north facing side over the winter, including on the unheated north-facing sunroom. The contractor has refused to acknowledge the errors, even the obvious chimney leak. I submitted a claim to both the contractor and the subs insurance. The subs insurance lapsed so they offered a lowball settlement covering replacement of the ceiling tiles in the room where the chimney is located. The contractor’s insurance denied my entire claim, stating “no coverage exists” for my loss. Their forensic engineer investigated the damage before they sent out their adjuster. I filed a claim with my insurance but they denied it too. I contacted an attorney who told me to get repair estimates for the interior damage. I’ve tried to get repair estimates but the contractors that looked at the damage tell me to hire a professional engineer. I called a PE and he recommended I hire a home inspector. Who do I need to hire? I lost my job due to illness from this leaky moldy roof so money is extremely tight at this point. I just keep going in circles! Someone please help me figure out what is causing all of this damage before my house collapses (although I think that’s a covered claim via my insurance policy, woohoo).
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
8/15/2016
Roof is going to be vastly under ventilated is going to be my guess here and there definitely should have been some underlayment. Some air sealing and insulation would, in theory, help lessen the moisture migration in the winter months, but the lack of underlayment is going to be problematic no matter what.
Guest User
8/25/2016
Thank you for your reply Eric. Any guess as to why its under-ventilated? There were no signs of ventilation problems before the metal roof was installed. Right now the indoor temp is 79 with indoor humidity of 82% with windows open and a fan running. It's extremely damp indoors all the time. Even over the winter. What problems occur due to lack of underlayment? I posted a pic of the ice-dam off the unheated north-facing sunroom. This did not happen before the metal roof was installed.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
8/26/2016
What color is the metal roof now? These type of low slope and poorly insulated sections are going to prone to ice damming.
Guest User
1/13/2017
I live in a 38 year old mobile home with the original metal roof. I've lived here for 12 years no problem with roof leaks, I coated the metal roof with Graco about 10 years ago. This year we've had plenty of rain, no leaks -- However on cold mornings [32 degrees] after the sun comes up and begins warming things my celling tiles [all original] start dripping water drops on one side of my 24 x 40 home -- it is also the side that gets the sun first. The original furnace is located on that side and vents directly through the roof. Most the drips are coming from the rooms on each side of the furnace enclosure. So my research tells me that the culprit is the Dew Point and I'm getting excessive moisture build-up on the underneath side of my metal roof. Is this a ventilation problem or could my furnace-vent be leaking warm air into my celling creating this problem? Can't figure why now, nothing has changed, what is the remedy?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
1/14/2017
Is there any chance that you do have a small roof leak that is allowing some moisture to get in, thereby increasing the potential, too, for condensation?
Guest User
1/14/2017
Its been pouring here [20 inches in January alone] no leaks only when the rain stops and the temperature drops to around 32 degrees in the morning does this occur. I checked for leaks on that side of the roof and decided to Graco all the seams and joints, no change, the underneath of my roof is condensing air into water droplets and dripping on my celling tiles?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
1/15/2017
It does sound like condensation. Has something been done to make the home tighter and increase it's humidity level inside? Is there a breach in the ceiling or vapor barrier that now allows moisture to reach places it did not reach before? You might want to look into closed cell urethane foam spray insulation which has good R Value and acts as a vapor barrier.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
1/15/2017
+1 Condensation from the saturated air. You need to run the AC and dry the air out or look at a proper vapor barrier across the ceiling.

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