David Dold
5/3/2016
This is uglier then a pig with lipstick. I have an eve 4:12 overhanging 2:12. I want this to look nice, this is the front of the house and highly visible. Please refer to pics, my goal is to remove the flashing on the upper eve and have metal to the house under the eve (pic 1). There is original shake way up there. I am sure it was pretty in 1938 when the house was built. Should I run a flush rakewall as far up under the eve as possible, then bend the panel to the eve. I am taking the roof down to deck, to do this right, should I remove the decking on the eve to expose the area underneath, remove the shakes, run new plywood, clean up the stucco, then run underlayment and ice shield from under the eve into the valley? (Too bad I can only post a single pic)
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
5/3/2016
Thanks. It sounds like you plan to install some kind of vertical seam metal roof, correct? If that is the case, your plan sounds good but I have only one caution. If you maintain that same gutter arrangement on the upper roof ... make sure that the water off the upper roof is not draining into a real narrow section of standing seam below -- you need to make sure the panels on the lower part are situated such that you have plenty of space between panel ribs adequate to handle the water coming from the upper roof.
David Dold
5/3/2016
My bad, this is Ultra Seam LS175 18" 24 ga. I plan to cap the gutter and put a downspout into the lower one. There is a alot going on in this section, the 4:12 to 2:12 is in the valley that terminates at this eve, this has to integrate somehow. The pencil in the attached pic is the 4:12, 2:12 trans. Do you recommend ice shield at the transition or is the underlayment sufficient? (I am San Diego Coastal) Thanks again.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
5/3/2016
Thanks. Certainly any additional waterproofing, such as ice and watershield, is never a bad thing!
David Dold
5/3/2016
It seams (lol) like this is all about tradeoffs seeking the holly-grail of symmetry of the panels. Studying the photo gallery it appears you should try for a seam at the ridge line into the main roof. I am lucky, I can do that on the main roof with a 12" panel at both gable ends. Which is awesome, I am thrilled, but then the wheels fall off. Having the seams line up in the valley on the adjacent sub roof (sorry I dont know the vernacular) is creating a problem. There is a chimney at the opposite end, see my previous post. Laying out the roof with the seam at the sub-ridge, matching at the valleys creates a problem at the chimney, a panel will end at the chimney. What can I do? My choices seem limited to sacrificing the symmetry of the main focal point of the roof to split a panel at the chimney? Seems like a horrible tradeoff. Either I stagger at the valley on the sub roof or lose the gable end symmetry/sub ridge symmetry. What do you do? One thing that comes to mind is a section of a narrow panel at the chimney. Guess this is why you guys make the big-bucks. Appreciate any advice you may have.

If you would like to reply to this thread, please log in. If you do not have an Ask the Experts forum user account, create one here.

Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.