Guest User
7/7/2015
Our roofing contractor has inadvertently installed a Kynar finished galvalume plus roof when an aluminum roof was specified. The house is 200' from a tributary of the James River and faces SSW. The river water is tidal and brackish with salt concentration varying from 5-18 ppt during the year. The contractor is offering a full 15 year warranty and a price discount if we will not make him replace the roof with the specified aluminum one. The manufacturer has allegedly offered to cover the roof with their usual materials only 20 year warranty (for what that is worth). The workmanship otherwise looks very good to excellent. Should we keep the galvalume plus roof or make the contractor replace it witht the specified aluminum one?
Dick Bus
7/7/2015
In my experience it should be replaced. If not you will see corrosion along the cut edges within a few years.
Guest User
7/8/2015
Thank you for your suggestion. The factory and contractor had both originally recommended aluminum due to the proximity to brackish water. Now that galvalume was used, they both are saying that it is really OK. I thought it possible that some of the Expert Panel might have had experience with galvalume roofs in similar situation where the owner may have simply decided to use it anyway. Here is a picture of the house with the river in the background. Any one else with any similar experience?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
7/9/2015
Unless they are willing to give you a rust warranty, I would make them accountable to the original contract.
Dick Bus
7/9/2015
if you go with a rust warranty, make sure your attorney writes it.
Guest User
7/10/2015
Thank you for your advice. I think that at the end of the day, it is just too much risk for me to assume and expect the GC and roofing contractor to be able to stand behind the warranty should I start seeing rusted edges in a few years. If push come to shove, the attorney's costs could be even more than a new metal roof. When I posted here, I was curious to see if anyone with experience in coastal areas might say that galvalume roofs really do hold up just fine near salt or brackish water, but that has not happened. To be sure, there is a challenge with guessing how the current roof will perform: the industry has experience with older products and processes, many of which are still in use, but predicting how well the newer paints and manufacturing will hold up seems like an educated guess-- they have not been around for 25 years yet. However, in my case, a cut edge is still a cut edge... and it seems that the industry has plenty of experience with that when it is near salt or brackish water-- is that correct?
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
7/10/2015
Have you called the material manufacturer? Ultimately, at the end of the day, it is only that enforceability that matters.
Guest User
7/11/2015
When I first looked into a metal roof, I spoke to both the manufacturer and several contractors. All parties urged me to use and aluminum roof. Since the mistake was discovered (by me), I have not spoken directly with any rep from the manufacturer. The subcontrator claimed that the manufacturer would provide their usual defective materials only warranty for the galvalume. I read it through and as usual, it specificially excluded things like the fasteners or cut edges rusting. Moreover, it did not cover labor. In the end, it was really not much of a warranty, as is the case with most manufacturer's warranties that cover only the material costs of "defective" materials and exclude any installation related items. We sent a letter to the contractor yesterday asking that the inadvertently installed galvalume roof be replaced with the originally specified aluminum roof. We were told that the subcontractor had ordered the materials and begun planning the work. It appears that the subcontractor simply admitted to their mistake and is planning to stand by their work. I plan to monitor that all will go well, especially as finishing work inside is well advanced.
Dick Bus
7/11/2015
Barry, you will not notice significant deterioration in the first couple of years. you will in the next five years.
Guest User
7/22/2015
Barry, may be my suggestion is a little late and all will be taken care of for a complete replacement, but as I was reading this discussion, I thought that if you did not want the inconvenience of replacing the roof at this time, you might ask the contractor to pay you cash for the labor and materials to replace it with aluminum. then you could take that money and put it into a safe investment that you could use to replace it when and if necessary. If it is not an inconvenience with the rest of the construction , then let them replace it.

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