Best way to keep minimal snow from building

Guest User
2/14/2014
We are building up a current metal awning that has a pitch of about 1/12 and want to get it as sloped as possible to keep snow from building up on it. This awning runs the full length of a loading dock area and only sticks out from the side of the building about 5 feet. So the awning runs approximately 175' long and 5' wide. They have had problems with the snow building because of the small slope and they also had someone weld angle iron on the edge of the roof to hold the snow from falling onto the trucks in the bays, but all that did was let the snow build higher until it iced up and fell off again. We want to build up on this awning to a much higher slope to keep the smallest amount of snow building on it. It is completely outdoors and no heat reaches it whatsoever. What is the recmmendation for roof pitch and should we also include clips at the edge to break ice should it form and break off?
Info @windowsonwashington.net
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2/14/2014
You shouldn't have much ice build up as you will only be dealing with the melting from the Sun's radiant energy. Do you have a gutter on the overhang? A 6-8:12 should keep the snow moving off pretty simply.
David Stermer
2/14/2014
Dane, Thanks for your question about metal roofing. The calculated snow load is zero at a roof slope of 70 degrees and steeper. For unobstructed (no snow blocks), unheated roofs, the full snow load is required at roof slopes of 15 degrees (~3:12) and flatter. The sloped roof snow load is proportional between roof slopes of 15 degrees and 70 degrees. For obstructed (with snow blocks), unheated roofs, the full snow load is required at roof slopes of 45 degrees (12:12) and flatter. The sloped roof snow load is proportional between roof slopes of 45 degrees and 70 degrees. I think you have to pick a strategy - if you want to keep the snow and ice ON the roof then leave it flat and add snow blocks. If you want to keep the snow and ice OFF of the roof then add slope and do not add snow blocks. Note that there may be a surcharge of drifting snow from the main building that may be eliminated by increasing the slope of the awning. Regards, David Stermer

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