Terry Coble
12/28/2013
I currently have a corrugated metal roof on a 1945 built cabin that is heated only by wood stove and not frequented much in the winter. the cabin is square and the roof has no valleys. The roofing material measured approximately 0.020" thick and appears to be a 26 gauge 2 2/3" x 1/2" metal. I need to replace the roof this summer because it is worn out and has several dents and holes. I would like to know if going to a thicker 20 gauge corrugated material would help minimize the tree limb dents that the old material would get and if i need to get a painted material to make it last longer in the snow? We get several feet of snow at the 5000 ft elevation and since there are no snow dams the snow slides off on its own. There are no structures near the snow slide area so we did not think we needed them. Also, since the snow could stay on the roof for long periods we thought it would be a bad idea to add them, but I would very much appreciate your opinion on this too. There are other styles of metal roofing around us, but they all seem really thin. If we decided to go with a raised seamed roof over the corrugated one how thick should we consider installing. The roof has a pitch of 8:12. I reviewed the FAQ, but didn't see a response that seemed to answer the thickness question. Thank you in advance for your response.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
12/29/2013
Any metal roof will do with snow but based on your other concerns (i.e. tree branches and impact protection) a 24 gauge (steel) standing seam roof would give you very good impact protection and would hold up very well.
Leon Martin
12/31/2013
Thickness is not necessarily critical if you go with a good quality product. Most exposed fastener roofing with a 40 year paint warranty is a durable product. Bare Galvalume also holds up good if 29 Ga grade 80 or 26 ga which is usually Grade 50 or softer. 24Ga would be better but not as readily available. 20 gauge is usually overkill and difficult and expensive to obtain. Concealed fastener panel 26 or 24 ga should also work great. All of them would likely perform best if on solid decking. Snow retention may not be necessary if not a hazard to man, beast, gutter, shrubs, vehicles and etc from potential dangerous sliding snow from the roof.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
12/31/2013
+1 26 gauge is fine but the 24 gauge will give you better penetration protection from the limbs.

If you would like to reply to this thread, please log in. If you do not have an Ask the Experts forum user account, create one here.

Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.