Guest User
6/6/2013
Our club owns a pole building where we Hold classes and have meetings. It is heated and cooled. It was built in the 1960s. It has the original metal roof that has been leaking for the last several years. The leaks are small, but we need to replace the roof. We have an estimate for a 29 gauge Panel Loc Plus metal roof. Is this thickness adequate? About how long should this roof last?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
6/6/2013
Without knowing a lot more about the building it's hard for me to say whether that panel is appropriate. That is a mid-level quality but entry-level design metal roof. Life expectancy should be 20 -30 years perhaps more with care and some maintenance.
Guest User
6/6/2013
What else do you need to know?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
6/6/2013
Sure. Thanks for asking. :-) What is the roof pitch? What is beneath the roofing? Is there solid decking? Is there any ventilation in the building?
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
6/6/2013
+1 My questions would be: - How is the building heated and cooled - What are the weather patterns and conditions like typically (snow load, hail, wind, etc) - Construction and materials type 29 is on the lighter side of what is made but in many circumstances, it is suitable.
Guest User
6/10/2013
The pitch appears to be 4.5 :12. However, it seems most pitches are in whole numbers. It appears the roof on it now is 26 gauge. Under the roof are 1" sheets of rigid insulation. I don't think there is anything else under the roof. The roof is attached to strips (purlins) 24" apart. It a post and frame building. Southern MI has hail, snow loads, wind etc. We have a gas furnace that heats to a minimum of 60. A small central air unit and a large window unit cool. It is not over 85 inside. Moat of the time it is between 65 and 85. The building is 40' by 80'. The first 20' has a loft over some offices. The remainder of the building is open to the roofs iwth rafters exposed. Thank you.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
6/11/2013
Insulating from the top down is going to be your best and most cost effective application here. Plan on putting at least another 3-4" of foam on the roof and that will give you good R-Value across that plane. After that, plan on doing and over deck style vent in which you run vertical purlins with another decking layer and created a vented space between the foam and the new roof deck. This will ensure that you have a breathable zone in the roof and therefore will not have unchecked snow melt or any condensation issues.

If you would like to reply to this thread, please log in. If you do not have an Ask the Experts forum user account, create one here.

Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.