Guest User
8/28/2001
I have a 1921 log house and I am considering a standing seam metal roof. My concern is that my rafters may not be perfectly level. Is there a certain thickness of metal I should use to span a gap if this is the case? Thanks, Avshockey
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
9/1/2001
I gather from your message that you want to install the metal roof without having to put down plywood or other solid roof decking. This can be done with some metal roofs. What you are seeking, then, is a metal roof style that has "structural" capabilities. These roof systems can go down without solid decking but they do require spaced apart "purlins" (aka "lathe boards" or "nailers") that are run horizontally on top of the trusses at specific intervals. The metal roofing is then attached to these purlins. Whether or not a metal roofing system is "structural" depends upn the total design of the product. Yes, metal thickness is one component of the design but the actual formed configuration of the panels plays a real bearing on this as well. I suggest choosing some metal roof products that you like the "look" of and then contacting the manufacturers to discuss whether they can be installed in this manner. Best Regards.
Guest User
8/18/2002
We're adding onto the house and will take this opportunity to eliminate leaks we get on our existing shingle roof when the wind blows the rain just right. Our slope is about 16%. In the summer we spend hundreds a month air conditioning in the San Antonio heat, so we'd like something heat resistent. We also get hail storms in San Antonio. Other residential metal roofs we've seen have a steeper slope, but we're told that metal would be a good way to eliminate leaks on a roof with as little slope as ours. We have no attic to speak of; though there are screened vents beneath the eves at the rear of the house. We'd rather spend more than have to worry about re-coating the roof in the future. The largest rectangle to cover is about 50' wide x 15' deep with the 16% slope. Can anyone offer suggestions re: 1. type and gauge of metal 2. type of finish 3. exposed or hidden fasteners 4. over existing shingles or remove them 5. suggested venting 6. radiant barrier type (if any) 7. other? Also, are there certifications or other indicators of contractor expertise we might check?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
8/19/2002
I think you are on a good path in terms of considering metal roofing. As long as I have figured things properly, your roof has slightly better than a 2:12 pitch. This will limit you primarily to various vertical seam metal roofs. If you look at another response I posted on this board earlier today under the Subject of "New Construction Bid Variance" you will find a description of some of the differences to look for and think about when choosing a metal roof. The new roof should always go down with a new underlayment, even if the old shingles are left in place. The old shingles can often be left if they are not badly cupped or curled. The underlayment, for your hot area, should be either one of the new "poly" underlayments or standard 30-pound felt with red rosin paper over it so that the felt does not stick to the metal over time and then get torn with expansion and contraction. I would strongly suggest venting the attic, preferably with soffit vents as the intake and a continuous ridge vent as the out flow. Metal roofs come in many colors and paint finifhes. For your best reflectivity, choose a very light color or find a manufacturer who is using the new reflective pigment paints which are reflective even in dark colors. As far as a radiant barrier ... they are only effective when the shiny side facses an airspace. For that reason, if you choose to use one, it would need to be used inside of the attic since you're using a vertical seam roofing panels which will rest right against the underlayment. All Best.
Guest User
8/27/2002
I'm trying to decide between asphalt shingle (you can walk on this, for instance if your house has to be termited) and the MiraVista Designer Metal can only be walked on on one side of each piece of metal. People walking on roof won't do this (one side of panel walking). Also looking into other kinds of metal and have been told by a roofing consultant that the gromets (sp?) that are used between nail and metal will deteriorate and have to be replaced in approx five years. I'm confused. Would like metal but know what asphalt will do. Can you help?
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
8/27/2002
Walking on any roofing surface deteriorates the finish prematurely. Ever notice how an asphalt roof will fail first around a chimney from the time a roofer spent on his knees detailing the flashing? There are many metal roof systems that are very walkable some concealed fastened like the Mira Vista and some exposed fastened although not all require a washer for sealing. Gromets are usually the metal reiforcing ring around a hole like in a shoe for the lace. I am assuming he is referring to a standard exposed roofing screw that has a metal washer over a rubber washer. Screws are available in various materials and designs and I would consult with the manufacturer of the product you choose to get the correct screw and placement. The biggest cause of screw failure is overtightening of the screw which causes the rubber washer out of shape and position. Bacxk to the walkability, again this is a value question and you should ask each manufacturer the question.
Guest User
8/26/2003
How much difference is there between 26 and 29 guage roof metal? I am told the warranty is the same for each 50 years? Also that the thickness is so minute I might as well take the cheaper product!
Guest User
8/27/2003
29 gauge metal will be around .013" thick while 26 gauge will be around .019" thick I believe. Chances are the warranties cover paint finish and do not include any sort of rust warranty. That would explain the similar warranty between the two.
Guest User
8/27/2003
Guest User
9/2/2003
Hello Carol, You may want to see if the manufacturer of the panels offers a substrate warranty. Most manufacturers have this. This covers the actual "metal" vs. just the paint finish. The roofing contractor should be able to get you a sample copy. About the thickness, depending on the type of panels you are going to be chosing, the thinner the metal...the more "oil canning" will be visible. "Oil Canning" is an industry term for waves that form in the panel due to thermal expansion and contraction. On a standing seam roof you will want to have stiffening ribs to help minimize this effect. It does not affect the performance of the roofing system. If your panels are a corrugated style than this would not apply. Sincerely, J Blair Metal Roofing Specialist
Guest User
9/3/2003
We are wondering if there is any need for 24 gauge metal on a residential roof. We have had 2 estimates done for our back roofs. One is based on 29 gauge and the other on 24 gauge. Both have a Galvalume finish, the 29 gauge is Millennium 2000 Paint system from ABC (25 year waranty on paint & panels) and the other is Kynar 500 Paint system (30 year manufacturer's color warranty) from SSR. We just want to make sure the product will hold up well. Thanks for your opinions. Sincerely, Marianne
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
9/4/2003
Desired metal thickness is a component of product design. Generally, sure, I'd prefer the heavier metal. However, again, based upon product design, a lower gauge product can outperform a thicker gauge one. Ask to see performance test results on both products. Goo look at older installations, talk to the owners. The Millennium 2000 name is a proprietary name "dreamed up" by ABC. I do not know for sure what type of paint system it is. Of pre-painted products, the Kynar 500 is generally recognized as the best, carrying the strongest fade and chalk warranty. Millennium 2000 may actually be Kynar 500 -- you'd have to ask ABC. Thanks for thinking metallically.
Guest User
1/10/2004
What is the minimum thickness copper panel? I am thinking about making my own roof panels from 4x8 cooper sheets. Any references you'd recommend to help me, e.g., books, web sites?
Guest User
1/10/2004
You might contact the Copper Development Association for their advice. In many cases, I have seen this work done in 16 ounce copper
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