Brad Todd
3/3/2013
I'm building a house just off the Chesapeake Bay and interested in a metal roof. I have a coated standing seam room in a less-coastal location in the mid-Atlantic and have been satisfied with it. Can you tell the metal roofs that have lower price points than the standing seam option? And a material recommendation? I'm assuming we will want to go with an aluminum product for corrosion reasons?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
3/3/2013
The lower price point would be exposed fastener products. There are companies making those in aluminum. Fabral comes to mind as one manufacturer you may want to look into. Good luck!
Deborah Haste
2/18/2014
We just purchased a house (this fall) and had to put on a new roof (by Dec.1st) along with new siding and new windows. The previous roof (shingle) did have a gable fan and two or three vents on top of the roof, allowing proper circulation. However, the new roof, the installer didn't allow for the fact that we do not have soffits on this house, and he put a ridge vent, which does not allow proper air flow, and now in the dead of winter, we have an entire house of ice damming! The attic is saturated, the insulation that is in there is completely wet and there isn't a nail without water on it. The water is now dripping down inside the walls, to the basement, all not seen until you get into the basement and of course, in the attic. Would a house without soffits do well with a metal roof, and what would help with proper ventilation? Of course, the siding also shows signs of water protruding underneath where water shouldn't be.. and now ice has formed, which makes us feel the wood underneath will only rot over time. The overhang of the roof is only about an inch.. very slight... this house was built in 1955, although solid, it does have some issues for contractors who don't understand the mechanics behind it. Would it be economically sound to have a metal roof installed, take off the new roof, as all of the ply wood is now soaking wet? What kind of metal roof would work for this house and what types of ventilation would make our attic and house sound? Thank you for your response.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
2/19/2014
The roof needs ventilation regardless of what it is covered with. The idea that ventilation is for top surface temperature is incorrect. It is for controlling moisture as you can unfortunately see in this case. There are ways to ventilate your existing roof. Call a roofer and ask about smart vent.
Guest User
2/19/2014
Hi Eric, Thanks for that response, and yes, a roofer has been called, but of course, no one wants to come out to see only the attic, they want to see the shingle as well, but with the snow and ice on it, it's rather difficult.. hoping the snow melts soon for that to happen. However, with all of the underlaying boards now saturated, all of the under felt saturated, isn't that a cause for problems to occur later on if the existing roof is then vented? Wouldn't it be better to redo the entire roof and start over? I would like to think if you put a brand new roof on, and this all occurred, with the same issues occurring before you put the new roof was put on... and why you did replace it.. so if a new roof will take place, then would a metal roof with proper ventilation be a better solution? We just had a pole barn put up with a metal roof, and although it's just a pole barn, and right now basic, the roof is appearing to do what roofs are suppose to do... But will ask about the Smart Vent... thank you.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
2/20/2014
If the roof is dried out, it is salvageable and the sheathing and felt will dry. Re-doing the roof because of the ice dam is fine but not unless you address the issues and lack of ventilation. Might be nice to have a metal roof to match the pole barn but you still need to ventilate. You can't ventilation standing seam via the smart vent so you will need to open the soffits up.
Guest User
2/20/2014
Well, there aren't any soffits to open up... that's one of the issues and there is no overhang to put soffits in. House was built in 1955 and I guess they didn't think it necessary... however, because of no soffits, the next best thing to do is?? We do understand that ventilation is the major issue here and because the roofer didn't take that into consideration, we're having all of these problems. Also because there a many multiple roof lines and valley's do you feel "crickets" should be applied? I know it's difficult to say without pictures, I might be able to get those for you.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
2/20/2014
Can you email me or post up a picture of the home. At a minimum as part of a roof project, I would highly recommend that you air seal and insulate prior to the new roof. [email protected]

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