Guest User
1/5/2013
My husband and I are about to break ground on our new house. When we were designing it, we decided we wanted metal on the two round towers that stick up on it. We mentioned to our builder that we like copper, and he told us the price of about 20k, it is simply not in the budget. My question is, what other metal material could we use for this and get a similar look? We are not too picky what it is, as long ad it has the old world feel. The house is all stone with stain glass, and on top of the two round tower, there are finials, so it needs to work with that. What would be a few suggestions we should look into? Thank you so much for any help.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
1/6/2013
Many manufacturers of metal roofing offer painted steel and aluminum products to look like new or like weathered copper. The trickiest part of this may be if the roofs are actually rounded. Feel free to send me drawings if you wish. [email protected] I also know that my company makes a standing seam with an optional textured powder coat finish which can achieve a very weathered or rusted look.
Guest User
7/29/2013
Hi. I am debating getting a .040" (17 gauge), aluminum standing seam roof on my home. The issue is, though, that the coil is effectively bare 3003 h14. I've read a post by an admin from 2005 or so about unpainted aluminum being prone to corrosion, and this contradicted my understanding of the nature of bare aluminum, and makes me insecure about my choice! I know that aluminum generally has the limiting factor being pitting, and I understand that exposed, weathered bare 3003 aluminum will suffer a potential pit of .040" in about 200 years, assuming it's kept relatively clean. Am I mistaken? Is aluminum really so inferior to copper or 316L ss that it is a poor financial choice in life-cycle cost/benefit comparisons?
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
7/29/2013
David, Where is the home located and what type of weather will it see? Eric
Guest User
7/30/2013
Well I've tried to post a number of times and I've gotten flagged for spam. I sent a direct email to support but I have not gotten a response. I'll post a much less detailed response and see if it passes the spam filter. Missing information is the info from EPA dot gov and links to weather graphs from city-data dot com. The home is located in a rural area just north of sacramento, california. Air data shows that the air quality here is about 30% worse than the average city in california. It is 80 miles inward from the coast and receives coastal winds some time. Average monthly rainfall is about two inches. There is rarely ever a smidgen of snowfall. Winter temps range from about 30 F to 110F. Average year round temp is about 60 degrees. Daily variance is around 30 degrees.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
7/31/2013
3003 is one of the purer alloys. Frankly, not a huge amount is known about its performance as a bare metal in roofing applications because it is not often used that way. Certainly the purity of the alloy will help though it does have a decent amount of manganese added. I generally do not suggest mill finish aluminum applications (and as I said, I have seen very few of them) but I did see one about a year ago and it had performed well for 20+ years. It was a very small application though and has since been removed. I guess that due to lack of direct experience I hate to say too much about what you're proposing but my gut feeling is that it will perform well and should be a fairly long term roof -- 40+ years. Do you know what thickness of metal you will be using?
Guest User
7/31/2013
Yes sir. It's .040", or 18 gauge in aluminum according to Engineering Toolbox. Equivalent thickness to 20 gauge steel. Well it sounds like it can't be all that bad, and I appreciate the response and perspective about the mysterious nature of exposed 3003 alloy. Thank you, Todd. I think I'll take one for the team and add this project to society's knowledge about exposed aluminum deterioration. Tally Ho!
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
8/2/2013
David, If you open multiple windows (I do it all the time) it does trip the MRA spam filter. It is a bit aggressive but it does that to try to keep the board clean. I am with Todd on this one as well. Seems like you application is probably one of the more well suited ones for an uncoated roof application. Post up some before and after pictures as we love to see pictures of homeowner projects. Eric

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