Guest User
10/12/2012
I'm looking at a Stone Coated Steel roof for a new home. The local installer is quoting a price with includes 15% waste factor. His total installed price quote is $6.50/ sq.ft. (6519 sq ft plus the 15%). Is this much wastage common? Is this a reasonable price for materials and installation? I have seen some complaints on the net concerning faulty installation and the manufacturers not willing to assist even with installers they recommended to the owner. I have also seen some complaints that the "50" year warranty is misleading, in that it only guarantees that hail will not damage the roofing to the point that it will leak, that the warranty is only "performance", not "appearance" and there is a risk of the stone coating deteriorating. One post I saw mentioned a 23 year old roof that had the acrylic coating deteriorating and blistering with time and the metal beginning to rust. At this price, these are all big concerns for me. I assume I should require the installer to be bonded in an amount adequate for replacement?? Any help will be appreciated. All of the "stone coated steel" products appear to be subject to damage from "improper installation". I didn't find a single instance where the owner of any of them was satisfied with the involved company response. Improperly installed asbestos shingles can certainly be a problem, but when you invest close to **$50 grand** in a high tech roof only to have the Mfr tell you they don't have any selection process tor their dealer/installers and don't even communicate with them when there is a problem, I begin to think steel roofs may not be all that wise a choice. Caveat Emptor.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/12/2012
Thanks Paul. You bring up many good questions. I would be happy to discuss these with you sometime if you would like to call me at 1-800-543-8938 ext 201 However, I will try to address some of your questions here. That would be a waste factor for a fairly cut-up roof normally. The way building products usually work is you will receive a product warranty from the manufacturer and a workmanship warranty from the installer. In some cases you may be able to work with the installer and the manufacturer to get an extended warranty from the manufacturer. That is not the norm though. Most hail warranties are against things like loss of surface coating, and perhaps leaks due to hail. these are meaningful but no one will warrant against indentations caused by hail -- to any roofing product or anything else that I am aware of. Proper installation is critical and that is where I suggest an experienced installer and someone recommended by the manufacturer. I also suggest sending the manufacturer a photo of your house for their input on the suitability of their products. Sometimes problems result because of products that were improperly used in the first place. I hope this helps. I would welcome talking with you in person though. All Best.
Guest User
10/12/2012
Thank you so much, Todd. I'll call you first of the week. Since I posted that last night I found that the husband of a nurse I work with is a professional roofing estimator (?) that works with Architects and contractors on large and small commercial buildings ( if you are a fisherman, Bass Pro's home office and store), and is very familiar with all types of steel roofing. He is going to look at the drawings and give us an estimate. Right now we just need some reliable numbers to take to the bank but I want to try to identify the people we are going to be working with. We do have a fairly cut up roof line. Something like 194 ft. of valley metal and 264 ft of hip and ridge caps. 1830 panels. This is from the one roofer we have spoken to so far. I will also be showing the plans to my friends husband this weekend, although I'm expecting the materials to be approximately correct. My concern is his pricing and, of course, his experience. The only thing that worries me a little is that he dropped his price by $8000 just because we didn't call him back after the first day. Haven't even started any bargaining yet. We want the best quality materials and are willing to pay more because this is our "last house" (we're pushing 70 but still working full time) and we have a large family. So a lot of the house is for visiting family, etc., and will be put in a trust along with our farm as a center for family gatherings and family identity for later generations. I intend for it to be just as useable 100 yrs from now as it's first year. So a roof that can reasonably be expected to last 50+ years is very important. (Will also have hydronic radiant heating-solar). We want to eliminate as many potential headaches in the near future as possible and make maintenance very minimal. Your site and those of the companies have convinced me this is the way to go. (Especially since teme is gone). We were considering standing seam, but I think this has a greater chance to be trouble free. Sorry about being so wordy, but I wanted to stress this isn't just a roof on a new house, we are trying to build a legacy. I look forward to talking to you.
Guest User
10/24/2012
Started to call today, got voice mail. This question isn't big enough to take your daytime time yet, probably others later! (Got 2 bids so far, about $30,000 apart !!) What is the importance of the battens on a new roof? The last bidder we got said he thought they just presented another something to rot. Seems to me that would only be if the roof leaked. He wanted to put the roof directly on the decking (we're looking at Gerard) and that doesn't sound right. For an extra 30 grand I don't want to hear talk about leaks !! So, how important is the battens? I know you need them over existing roofing. And for this application, what is the best decking to consider? We'll probably go with the installers best advice for our area, but I like to go into things with at least a little bit of knowledge.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/24/2012
Paul, I'd still love to talk and I am sorry you got my voice mail. I will check and see if you left a message. I will be happy to call you back. Basically, there are metal roofs which, due to their design, "must" be installed over batters, metal roofs which "can"be installed over battens or over decking, and metal roofs which must ONLY be installed over solid decking. So, you see, it has much more to do with the design of the product than with anything else. Rarely (though certainly not "never") do I run into a job which I feel absolutely has to have battens. Again, all good stuff to discuss. And unfortunately as you talk to people you will find folks who have "heard" things to do with these issues but those are typically old wives tales ... Hope we get to talk, Paul!

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