Standing seam roof transition into hidden gutter

Joey Beck
8/7/2012
I am rebuilding a porch that has an elaborate cornice detail that contains a hidden gutter. The roof is standing seam metal that was fabricated on site by a roofing contractor nine years ago. The roof / gutter have been leaking for the majority of those nine years and the subsequent damage is tremendous. I have been doing a lot of research regarding standard practices of standing seam metal installation and that research has led me to believe the roofing contractor failed to follow many of these standards. 1. The material used appears to be to thin and has a lot of buckling in the trays and valleys. 2. The transition from the roof plane into the gutter does not appear to be correct. The standing legs of the roof are mashed flat on the last 6" - 8" of the roof at the transition into the gutter tray. (This creates an up-slope pointing pocket for water to enter and appears to be the main source of the laeking.) 3. The roof panels are cut back from the gutter tray roughly 4"-6" and appear to have been caulked down in some areas and possiblely soldered in others. 4. The valley flashing was laid in flat with no rib running in the center. This flashing is extremely loose and has a great deal of buckling. The roofing contractor claims the leaks are due to the homeowner not painting the roof on a regular basis. However, there is minimal rust and the paint is not peeling. Could someone please provide me with the following: 1. A detailed drawing that shows the proper way to transition the roof panels into the hidden gutter. 2. The minimum gauge of metal that is acceptable to construct this type of roof. 3. The minimum thickness of the galvanized coating. 4. The proper way to construct the hidden gutter tray. Thank you for the input and knowledge.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
8/7/2012
The hidden gutters should be lined and that lining brought up under the metal roof, and under the underlayment for the metal roof. the gutters should be lined with as high quality of material as possible. The standing seam ribs should be left intact as they approach the hidden gutters. Metal thickness has mote to do with product design than anything else. Thicknesses anywhere from 29 to 24 gauge would not be unexpected. I would suggest at least G90. I hope this helps some.
Joey Beck
8/7/2012
Thanks Todd. Should a drip edge type flange be fabricated into the back wall of the gutter tray and then allowed to go onto the plane of the roof? Then should the tray of the roof panel be left long in order to be tucked under and hemmed to the drip edge flange of the gutter tray?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
8/7/2012
The actual detail of this has much to do with what sort of metal roofing is being installed. What you're describing though would be appropriate for a concealed fastened standing seam.

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