Problem with Standing Seam Metal Roof

Brian Chatham
10/18/2011
I have a brick rolled standing seam metal roof just installed. There is what I believe to be excessive "Oil Canning/Fish-Tailing". The metal when it is lying on the ground shows no sign of this defect. It is on the right edge of nearly every panel. I have had the installer as well as a rep from the metal company look at my issue. They both agreed there is "in their words" some excessive fish-tailing. They recommended that I wait 4-6 months to let the metal expand and contract so it should lie down. I cant see the metal relaxing this much in 60 years. I understand that working with metal I will inevitably gets some fish-tailing but to me this seems excessive. Even my contractor agrees it will never lie down as we were told. Any ideas or recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thanks ...
David Stermer
10/18/2011
Brian, Thanks for the question. Oil-canning can appear from a variety of sources. It is interesting that none is present in the metal panel prior to installation. This seems to indicate that the panels were properly manufactured. One possibility is a roof plane that varies from flat (in a uniform plane). If the roof plane is not flat then resheathing or adding battens could bring the roof plane back to flat and may reduce the oil-canning. It is certainly possible that the oil-canning would reduce over time. I do not have any data that would support this though. Regards, David Stermer
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
10/19/2011
Sounds to me like a decking issue as well if it did not show in the raw materials as well. http://www.metalconstruction.org/pubs/pdf/95-1060%20MCAoilcanning.pdf
Guest User
4/7/2017
I had a Standing seam metal roof installed on a new house I had built last year. Since then, areas of the roof have come up in high winds. This is disappointing as I believed I was investing more money in something that was maintenance free for the life of the house. I feel like this must be a faulty installation and I should push the builder to totally replace. The repairs so far have resulted in the roofer putting a few screws through the metal roof which defeats the purpose of have a standing seam roof. Does anyone have advice on what they think could be causing panels to blow up and or have an opinion on demanding total replacement due to faulty installation?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/7/2017
Lee, I am very sorry to hear of this. Please feel free to send me photos if you wish and I will try to give you some ideas. My email is [email protected]
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
4/7/2017
+1 Putting screws through a standing seam roof is a huge No - No in my opinion. Effectively defeats the entire purpose of that panel and material selection.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/8/2017
Lee, I am so sorry. I mistakenly deleted your last post with the photo. Please feel free to re-post. I am so sorry -- slip of my fat fingers! Anyway, am I correct that this is a "nail flange panel" -- in other words, is there a strip running down one edge of the panels that has slotted holes for screws? If so, can you tell if the screws (or other fasteners) have loosened or if the panel locks have just disengaged, leading to the failure? If it is the latter, then I am concerned the machine was not in good adjustment when the panels were run. That said, of course, if the structure sustained extremely high winds, that could be the fault as well but I'd expect this panel to withstand at least 80-mph winds and probably higher.

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