Jon Sheets
8/11/2011
I have a huge problem with ice dams forming along the edges of my eves. They freeze to the existing asphalt shingles making them impossible to remove. When they do come down, they tear the shingles off. Do Ice dams form on a metal roof, or do they break off from lack of a textured surface to cling to? Would switching to metal roofing solve this problem?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
8/11/2011
Jon, metal roofing can help but I want to stress that metal roofing is not a reliable solution to this problem. Yes, the reflectivity and slickness of a metal roof will encourage ice and snow to slide but ice damming is generally caused by "hot spots" over the heated areas of the home. Heat rising from the home's interior melts the snow which then runs down the roof, freezing on the home's unheated roof overhangs, creating damaging ice dams. Metal roofing can be just as susceptible to this as any other roof. The best way to try to end ice damming is through increasing insulation on the attic floor and ventilation in the attic. If the home's construction does not allow for this, you can also construct a "cold roof" over the existing roof. Metal lends itself well to that type of construction. I have written quite a bit about ice dams at the following website, if you're interested. http://www.asktoddmiller.com/roofing-solutions/snow-ice-dams-and-metal-roofing/
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
8/11/2011
Ice dams are not a roof material issue but a heat loss and insulation issue. Proper ventilation will help mitigate the issue the heat loss but will not cure what is the substantive source of the problem. Air sealing and insulation combined with attic ventilation will fix every ice dam issue. Get a building scientist to look at the home and fix the cause of the ice dam.
Guest User
5/10/2012
Does moss grow on metal roofing like it does on other roofing? We have lots of trees around our house and not much such hits the roof in spots.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
5/11/2012
Not as likely. The issues with moss growth on asphalt is that they stay wet in addition to providing a food source. Metal does not do either of these things. Metal dries out instantaneously and minus the organics that might accumulated on the roof via debris, it is not a food source like asphalt is. We have replaced terribly stained and organic looking asphalt roofs with metal and several years later...no evidence of growth.
Guest User
8/7/2013
Two questions. We have an 80 year old Tudor home in South Minneapolis. It's a brick home with vines growing up the south side and partially on the east side. Where the power comes into the house, the vines have started to spread to the power line and now up the asphalt roof. Would a metal roof stop the creeping? Logic would tell you yes, but the vines have no problem attaching to the gutters and downspouts. Also, our satellite dish is connected to the roof. Does a metal roof interfere or make it more difficult for the satellite company to perform any needed maintenance? The roof isn't as steep there, but it still has a pitch.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
8/7/2013
My suspicion is these vines would grow across the metal roof as well. As for the satellite dish ... I do not see any major problems but if it could be re-mounted to the fascia instead of the roof, it would avoid having to put holes in the roof.
Guest User
9/17/2014
Hi Todd, Two questions actually, the first pertains to my existing asphalt roof. It is approximately 20 years old, and still in reasonable shape. Is it possible to "incorporate" a section of metal roof where a problem exists? Second question, our builder built a fine house including a 3 pane window box in our master bath. Unfortunately he failed to finish that section of the roof with any sort of overhang, soffit, or flashing protection for the fascia. He did overhand the shingles 1 inch. When we first moved in I noticed this problem waiting to happen, and added drip-face flashing (eave trim) and an additional piece of heavy metal flashing to extend out over the edge by about 3." ( I inserted the flat flashing under the shingle and moisture barrier as best I could. I retarred over the new nails in the shingles) So, when Sandy came through she ripped out some of my "gerry-rigged" overhang and then during last years ice storms we had our first ever "ice dam." Can I use metal roofing 6 feet high and incorporate it into the existing roof after I build out a proper overhang?? PLUS...ANY ideas or suggestions you have would be greatly appreciated! Thanks Todd. Ken
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
9/17/2014
Hi Ken, it is probably possible to do that though it will likely easiest with a very low profile metal roof. Do you have any photos you could email to me for review? [email protected]
Guest User
9/17/2014
Thanks for replying Todd! I'll get out there on a ladder tomorrow weather permitting, and take some pictures. The more I noodle things through the more I realize that in our haste to occupy our newly built home, I FAILED in calling the builder to task regarding that kick out window box! There was no overhang or soffit and it was just a matter of time and Hurricane Sandy that dictated when we'd get ice dammed! Let me see what I can show you in the pictures. Thanks again for your help.
Eric Novotny
An informed customer is the Best Customer!
9/20/2014
Whatever you can post up will help.

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