Robert Welch
7/19/2011
In Sept 2002 I had a 24 gauge prepainted Galvalume roof installed on my house. It had a 30 year finish and no leak warranty. I do not climb so I did not inspect the finished project thinking it was professionally done. However, in the recent winter the exhaust pipe came off and I had my son go up to see what happened. He found that the exhaust pipe had been cut and that there were numerous dings all over the roof, along the eves and where they must have screwed part of it down. I am now having a lot of difficulty getting the installer to make good. All that to ask the questions: What causes the dings to happen? And is it normal for this type of roof to experience dings and rusting after only eight years? Do manufacturers, i.e. Clad Tex, Valspr etc to make good if the installers do not? Sorry to be so wordy but needless to say I am greately discouraged after spending so much to have a solution to snow and ice on the roof in the Maine winters. Thanks.
David Stermer
7/29/2011
Robert, Thanks for your interest in metal roofs. The photo that you attached showed rust spots. These are not typical. It appears that the paint film has been damaged, possibly during installation or subsequent events. The manufacturers do not provide coverage to panels that have been damaged. They only provide coverage for panels that have fail when exposed to normal atmospheric conditions. Working to get this corrected through the installer is the proper course of action. The installer can confirm if this is a paint problem with the panel manufacturer. Best regards, David Stermer
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
7/29/2011
That is definitely not normal atmospheric wear. That is damage and then oxidation to exposed, uncoated metal. I would like to see the back of that panel as well.
Robert Welch
9/14/2013
Further investigation, the installer said that the problem is delaminating caused by Clad Tex experimenting with the primer. Why would any experimentation be needed for galvalume since it has been around for awhile? In addition, I learned that the industry practice is to pass on the manufacturers warranty to the consumer. The only warranty I received was from the installer who refuses to honor that warranty. In addition I have learned that there are unlicensed Chinese manufacturers of "Galvalume" that does not meet the standards of the industry. How can I determine if a genuine Galvalume product was used on my roof? Also do you have any information about the "going out of business" by Clad Tex? I am beginning to think that, not only myself but the installer, we have been dishonestly dealt with by Bradco Supply and Clad tex. I understand that there are other sujch problems in New England: Why would the primer that is used for genuine Galvaume need to be tweeked, unless attempting to prime an inferior product? What caused Clad Tex to suddenly go out of Business? Why is Bradco being uncooperative with the installer? Why didn't the installer have the warrantee to pass on to me? By the way, I have at least 41 other areas on my roof that is rusting. I just noticed that my e-mail is now [email protected] . Thanks
Guest User
9/1/2017
We installed a 24 gauge standing-seam metal roof in the fall of 2002, identical to the time period that Robert Welch installed his Bradco metal roof. Our roof was produced by a competitor that does a lot of business in Maine. The material comes with a 35 Year Trinar Limited Warranty: "__________. warrants, in the continental United States that under normal atmospheric conditions (which term excludes ag-gressive atmospheres such as those contaminated with chemical fumes or salt spray) the exterior paint on its prepainted Trinar ________™ and _________™, products will meet the following specifications: Film Integrity: Will not crack, check, blister or flake for a period of thirty-five(35) years and one month." According to the manufacturer from whom we bought the roof, the coil was painted by Coat Tex Metals, the same company that Mr. Welch references in his posts. In 2014 we started noticing large rust spots (see attached photo taken earlier this month). The manufacturer told us that there was a problem with the "precoat" treatment because the roller system used to apply the precoat was "skipping". Because the "precoat" was a clear material the skipping couldn't be seen (according to manufacturer) before the "primer" and "Trinar" finish was applied. We now have rust spots all over our roof and each year it is getting worse. We are now talking to the manufacturer from whom we bought the roof in hopes of resolving our complaint resolved without going to court.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
9/1/2017
What they have told you is a plausible scenario. The only way to confirm it would be to remove a panel and take it to a lab for testing. The photo you supplied, to me, opens up another possible scenario in that during the installation, hot shards of metal from saw cutting nearby panels embedded into the paint system, setting off a reaction that resulted in the rust spots. If panels were not saw cut on the job site (and hopefully they were not), then I do not think that is what could have happened.
Guest User
9/1/2017
Thanks Todd. Our metal panels were not cut on-site as everything was pre-fabricated at the plant. In fact the manufacturer's plant manager's own house has the same rusting problem on one side of his roof but not on the other. One part of his roof was made from the bad coil stock and the second coil was fine. One side is rusting and the other is not. The manufacturer readily admits that the mistake that is causing the rusting occurred at Clad Tex Metals plant in Pennsylvania where the coil was painted.
Info @windowsonwashington.net
An informed customer is our best customer.
9/1/2017
Sounds like they have owned up to the issue. What have they suggested as a solution in this case?
Guest User
9/1/2017
They are being good about honoring the material part of their warranty. Our situation is complicated by the fact that the roofing material was defective, through no fault of our own, the day it went on our roof - something that has really put us in a funny spot because the cost to install the replacement material quite high. My wife and I are both architects and use to dealing with similar issues. This is the first time that we have had to stand up for ourselves since it is our own home. We are hopeful that we are going to be able to work something out on an amicable basis.

If you would like to reply to this thread, please log in. If you do not have an Ask the Experts forum user account, create one here.

Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.