j o
9/26/2010
I am installing a metal roof (pro-snap, 26 gauge hidden fastener system) on the rear of my late 19th century home One of the sides has a pitch change where a porch was closed in to make the bathroom. This roof plane goes from about a 9-12 to 3-12. The lower section is being completely reframed at the moment and I am connecting these two sections so the rafter spaces can be used for ventilation. I will be putting insulation board under the rafters because everything is exposed right now. I was thinking of slitting the locking seams about 6 inches on the lower panels, flattening them out, caulking them together with duralink0 and bending this section up the other pitch. Then I would line the upper roof's seams to the lower and caulk along the edges. Does this sound okay?
Guest User
9/26/2010
No No No it will not work ever ,that will be hard of a job ,
Guest User
9/26/2010
Hey another thing would be is just pull poly all over the roof BLACK would work the best then u don`t need any metal at all
j o
9/27/2010
This roof is very visible and would look awful with a membrane. How would be best to transition the panels without involving exposed fasteners per the manufacturer's accessories? I haven't used any of their trim becasue of this issue, and have bent the roofing up against the sidewalls and over the drip edges on the part already finished.
Nate Libbey
9/27/2010
jo, I would ignore Mr>bush in this instance. He has been putting irrelevant replies all over the place. I would avoid lapping and caulking the seams unless specifically advised to do so by the manufacturer. Caulk is good in some instances, but isn't something I'd want to trust my transition too, as it will not stretch with the panels as they expand and contract. I have attached a drawing showing one common way to flash transitions, with hidden fasteners, although there are many other methods to do this.
Guest User
9/28/2010
Thanks for the picture. I think I can have a friend with a large brake make this up for me. is that z-flashing made up of separate pieces; one for each panel, between each seam?
Nate Libbey
9/29/2010
You're quite welcome. The Z-flashing can either be separate pieces (easiest and most commonly done or It can be longer pieces that have the ribs cut out of them. In this case the z-flashing will have to be slightly taller than the panel ribs.
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