m m
6/23/2009
I am in the process of getting a new roof along with solar panels. I am considering a standing seam metal roof because it would allow installation of the panels without any roof penetrations (standing seam mounts). I had initially set myself on getting a regular shingle roof. But concerns about heat, as well as concerns about roof penetrations that would be required for the solar install have led to second thoughts. My concerns are as follows: 1) My roofer recommends that I get an uncoated galvalume roof. He says that coatings invariably fade, crack etc. Is this valid? Are coated roofs more expensive? Conversely, what potential issues could one face with with an uncoated roof? 2) He is recommending a heavy duty 24 gage galvalume roof. He says that this is the heaviest gage around. Is this true? Our location is prone to hail storms. 3) The cost is double that of a basic shingle roof. My roof is 46 squares and the cost is coming to over $20K. Is this in the ball park?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
6/23/2009
1) Coated roofs are more costly. Quality coatings have a tremendous track record of performance. Most experienced metal roof folks know that. Uncoated roofs tend to have shorter life in the very long term. 2) 24 gauge is fairly heavy. Some 22 gauge exists. Impact resistance has to do with product design, too, not just metal thickness. Look for a product that passes Class IV UL 2218 testing. 3) Metal roofing comes in a wide range of prices. What you have been quotes would be, I would say, on the lower end of metal roofing prices. Keep in mind that some metal roofs also offer integral PV systems.
m m
6/23/2009
Hi Todd, Thanks for your reply. Yes, the roof that they are installing is Class 4 and UL rated. It is also energy star rated so that I can get the $1500 FTC. 1) I was told by my roofer that I have two choices of widths - 17.75 and 19.75", both with snap lock. He says that the smaller width has less issues with "oil barreling", but the negative is that it has more joints etc. What would you folks recommend? 2) Are there any issues with snaplock (as my solar installer seemed to imply?) 3) In order to keep costs down, I am leaning towards an unpainted roof. Should I be concerned with roof life as you suggest? About 50% of my roof surface will be covered with solar panels. 4) What sort of attic venting is required? When I was planning to go with shingle roofing, I had planned to put attic fans etc. However, with a metal roof, should passive venting be enough? I am hoping that this being an energy star metal roof, my attic should be cooler. Thanks again for all your advice.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
6/23/2009
Thanks for your questions. I will try to answer... 1) I would go with the narrower ... generally I find for most houses, narrower is a better fit architecturally. 2) Not really. 3) You will have some shorter life probably with unpainted but you will also have a lower initial cost. 4) I would suggest eave soffit vents and a ridge vent.
Guest User
6/27/2009
Todd, Thank you for your reply. I have decided to go for a kynar painted (sierra brown) metal roof, with ridge vent. I wanted white (the most efficient), but I had to give in to my wife on the color :) I am getting the whole thing done (46sq) for approx $21K, not including the $1500 energy star credit. I found your forum to be very useful in helping me learn about metal roofs! Regards, M
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
6/27/2009
Thanks for choosing metal
m m
6/27/2009
Todd, sorry for yet another question, but what sort of documents should I expect from the roofing company that shows it is energy star compliant (for my tax credit) and Ul Class 4 certified for impact resistance (for my insurance). Thanks.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
6/28/2009
The product should be labeled either on the product itself or the packaging for the impact resistance rating. For the tax credit, the product should be listed on the Energy Star website and you should also be able to receive a certificate of verification from the manufacturer.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
6/28/2009
If your insurance requires it, the roofing manufacturer should also be able to provide a letter or certificate for the impact resistance.
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