snap together or pry hem & push

Guest User
12/31/2008
I'm checkung out my standing seam roof system I got from McElroy Metal (Medallion II). The "rake trim" and "eave drip trim" clip to a cleat that is screwed to the structure. The hem on the trim pieces are so tight I cant simply push it on the cleat. The hem appears pressed together and touching. Do I need to pry open the hem or is it supposed to be tight (feels more like immpossible) when installing on the cleat?
Guest User
1/1/2009
O boy either you have the directions upside down or bob villa sent you the wrong ones. Either way you are trying to install it wrong. You use the cleat in the valley and screw the extended eve drip down first then hem the sheet itself. I hope you added the extra inches needed to install corecctly
Guest User
1/1/2009
I don't think I was clear enough. I am not talking about the roof panels themselves. I did add extra inches and I will hem those panels to go over the eave drip. I'll just be specific to the eave drip this time. This is the piece at the bottom of the roof that the panel hem wraps around. It is fastened by screws to the roof deck. Before that. there is a strip that fastens to the gutter board with screws called the perimeter cleat. The bottom of the eave drip has a small hem, or bend, that was put there when the metal was formed at the manufacturer. The bottom of the eave drip is slid or pushed on to the bottom of this perimeter cleat, which holds the bottom of the eave drip to the gutter board snug. Then the eave drip is screwed to the roof deck. This can be seen in the following link. http://www.mcelroymetal.com/elements/files/STDEAVEDRIP5.pdf The problem is the factory hem or bend at the bottom of the eave drip is very tight. It appears I have to pry open this bend so the perimeter cleat will slide in. Is this how it is done? Maybe I need a special tool. Am I'm supposed to tap it on with a rubber mallet? Anybody have any input.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
1/2/2009
I would encourage you to check back with McElroy and let them know the problems you are having. The hems should be open enough to slip them over the cleat. There is a chance that the parts were mis-made or they might have sent parts that were not intended to be installed with cleats. Depending upon the exact parameters of your job, you may get by without these cleats. Ask them about that as well.
Guest User
1/3/2009
well im sure that without out using the cleat for a starter it is still an acceptable install. It may change the wind warranty though. what I suspect is you ordered the material from your local metal center and ordered what you thought was correct based on your own research but what you didnt find in your search is that you can order your trim pieces with a "open hem" or a typically they will come with a "Closed hem" Just because a cleat is included with your order dosent mean you are using it for a starter, O well lessoned learned
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
1/14/2009
Thanks.
Guest User
1/20/2009
You don't need a special tool other than a pair of pliers or vice-grips. I've ran into this problem a few times myself. Take a scrap piece of your panel, hold it with the pliers or vice-grips, insert it into the seam, and pull along the seam. Wear gloves and be careful not to cut your self. In a nutshell,,, open the seam.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
1/21/2009
Thanks.
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