Guest User
6/24/2001
I AM BUILDING A FARMHOUSE WHICH HAS A CURVED ROOFLINE COMING OUT OVER THE FRONT PORCH. CAN I PUT A V5 CRIMP STYLE METAL ROOF ON THIS?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
6/24/2001
To the best of my knowledge, 5-V Crimp is going to be one of the harder metal profiles to apply to a round or partially round roof. If the roof is actually segmented by hips, that makes things easier. Some of the shingle products can be applied to round roofs. Also, there are some standing seam products available in tapered panels that are designed for round roofs. To further investigate 5-V Crimp for use on your roof, contact the Vertical Panel Manufacturers from the following page of the MRA website and inquire directly with them. My company does not manufacture 5-V Crimp so I am sorry that I cannot give you a more dfeinitive answer. http://www.metalroofing.com/members.cfm?action=about
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
6/24/2001
To the best of my knowledge, 5-V Crimp is going to be one of the harder metal profiles to apply to a round or partially round roof. If the roof is actually segmented by hips, that makes things easier. Some of the shingle products can be applied to round roofs. Also, there are some standing seam products available in tapered panels that are designed for round roofs. To further investigate 5-V Crimp for use on your roof, contact the Vertical Panel Manufacturers from the following page of the MRA website and inquire directly with them. My company does not manufacture 5-V Crimp so I am sorry that I cannot give you a more definitive answer. http://www.metalroofing.com/members.cfm?action=about
Guest User
6/26/2001
I am planning a standing seam steel roof system with 15" wide pans, single locked. Roof pitch is 4 in 12 on a single story ranch. 2 X 6 Doug Fir rafters on 16" centers. Roof sheathing is one inch ship lap or T & G . While structurally sound, there is perhaps a 1" to 2" "sag" measured at the center of the rafter span. I feel this slight sag would be visually unattractive if covered directly with the steel panels. To correct this condition I was planning to furr with 1 X 4 utility spruce . All 4 edges would be furred, with horizontal battens 18" on center.Battens would be shimmed up as necessary to create a flat plane for the vertical steel panels. Clip system to be used with stainless screws at the center of each batten through the batten and 3/4 sheathing. Questions: 1. Is this a good approach at all? 2. Is a 36" wide strip of ice & water barrier at the drip edge with 30# felt paper up to the ridge adaquate? Is a high temperature type of ice & water necessary? 3. Any problem with condensation trapped underneath panel? 4. Any problems I have overlooked? I would appreciate advice on this. Thanks
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
6/26/2001
Hi David. I am not the world's leading authority on standing seam installations but, overall, what you describe sounds good. I have seen similar things done in the past. A couple of things I want to add though: Make sure that the standing seam you're using is approved by its manufacturer for applications spanning 15". You might consider running vertical furring first, and then your horizontal fastener purlins on top of that. The vertical furring will help to smooth the dip in the roof. It would also allow you to run ventilation from the eave up to the ridge. This would help to ensure that there are no condensation problems. Vertical furring also allows any condensation that might occur to run down the underlap and exit at the bottom. You should not need to use high temp underlayment for this application. Since the underlayment will not be in contact with the metal, it cannot adhere itself to the metal at high temps. Good luck. Write back if you have more questions. Thanks.
Guest User
8/1/2001
How do you fix your valleys with the metal roofin? we have to valleys on our house and we are interested in putting a metal roof on this house. Is the anything special you have to purchase to fix the valleys with?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
8/1/2001
Metal roof systems typically use pre-formed valley pans beneath the roofing panels themselves. These are typically formed from the same metal with the same color and type of finish. The design of the pans varies based upon the particular roofing system. There are also additional accessories such as ridge, hip, eave, and roof-to-wall flashings.
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