Guest User
4/9/2008
So I had a 26 gauge standing seam installed on a roughly 8:12 existing roof, on 12" center lathe over 2x6 ceiling rafters. there is no vented cap, no insulation and a round vent on each side of the main roofed house. and the lenth is about 74' long and 35' wide ( attic size also ). every strong wind we get it makes lots and lots of noise. like thunder and the roofs coming off. I believe it's the vents because the are venting straight to the roof causing it to pop, but i could be wrong. some one recommends strongly to replace the roof and have a decking installed. I doubt thats neccesary just of noise. but is it structually sound?? what could i do to fix all the noise?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/20/2008
Do youi have soffit vents for intake air? Your vents may be trying to draw air but not having anyplace to get it from.
Guest User
4/20/2008
Robin, I don't know what type of metal roof you installed, but on standing seam roofs over open purlins (no decking) we have to install vinyl faced insulation over the purlins and then put the metal panels over it. Without the insulation, the wind moving across the panels creates a noise that will move across the roof. I have seen technical manuals that describe this as 'roof rumble'. [email protected]
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/20/2008
Thanks Wade.
Guest User
4/22/2008
No.. there are no sofits. just the the gable louvers on each end of the house. And i've heard many things from differents roofers. Others who just want to make a little money i think off of me say for instance, it needs a vented ridge cap, so.. What ya think?
Guest User
4/22/2008
Correct me if im wrong, purlins are Metal only? or would you call 2x6 wood rafters purlings also?
Guest User
4/22/2008
The 2x6 rafters are just that, the rafters. The boards that are attached to the rafters that you are attaching the metal to are called purlins. If they are 1x4's and spaced closely together, we call them lathes, but they are really about the same thing. If you used a standing seam with clips that allow the metal to slide in them for expansion and contraction, we call them floating clips and the metal can move up and down a little when the wind gusts hit them. That is one way you could be getting the noise. Another would be a thin metal roof over widely spaced purlins and the wind is actually flexing the panel to make the noise
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
4/27/2008
Thanks Wade.
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