Guest User
11/10/2007
Thinking of replacing asphalt shingle roof with metal roof. One contractor says ok to use 30#felt, 29gauge metal and NOT remove shingles. He apparently uses Elk roofing materials. Other contractor says he always removes shingles and uses15# felt, 29gauge metal. He apparntly deals with Fabral Systems. Do you see anything I should be concerned with in these two statements? Thank you, Suszy
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
11/14/2007
Yes, in that Elk is a manufacturer of asphalt shingles, not metal products. I would opt for the heavier underlayment personally. 29 gauge is the lowest gauge commonly used for metal roofing so that has you into a loiwer end product probably. However, if it is heavily corrugated it has a lot of strength and if the shingles are not real badly curled you could install over them probably without issues. I would also take a hard look at the paint system quality on the metal roofs being compared.
Brian Selig
Architectural Building Components Metal Roof and Wall Panels
11/14/2007
There are so many different choices of metal roofing. I suggest removing the old roof. You rid the roof of the weight and likely will improve the appearance of the new installation. I see the contractors advantage: no tear off, no dump charges, etc. For you, A clear roof with a premium underlayment and a new long-lasting, low maintenance roof is apparently the goal. Don't let the contractor's goals interfere. I like synthetic underlayments like Sharkskin or Titanium, rather than felts. I also like a metal roof with hidden fasteners. Yes, you will pay a little more. If done right, you'll get tax credits, energy savings, and you won't be fixing leaks or replacing your roof for the rest of your life. The contractor will be in control of that last one. I hope you have a good one.
Guest User
11/15/2007
Elk was bought out by GAF and the product line is changing. Todd is right about the 29 gauge metal. You really want a heavier metal. 26 gauge is better and 24 gauge is even better. It seems as though the 26 gauge is more of an industry standard. The manufacturers can tell you if it is or not. Brian is right about the tear off. As an installer, I don't care about tear offs but you do get a lot better job. I tell my customers up front they will get a better installation by removing everything down to the deck.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
11/16/2007
Thanks everyone.
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