Kathleen Dearing
11/1/2007
I have tentatively arranged to have a metal shake roof installed made by Metro Roof Systems. I am getting confused now as to whether this is really my best choice as someone told me this would be a hotter choice than asphalt composition. I cannot find this company listed with Energy Star but my contractor gave me an information sheet indicating it qualifies for the 2006 Energy Tax Credit. I would appreciated your opinion of this company. Which do you think is the best manufacturer of metal roofing? Do you think this will be a problem-free roof for this climate? I currently have an ashphalt composition over a wood shake. Both of these will have to be removed and it is my understanding that my choices are either the metal or ashpalt composition. I am told that tile/concrete is too heavy and that wood shake is outlawed in this area. Thanks for any and all help. I think I've decided but then start re-reading/thinking and wonder if I should go with asphalt. Which is really the lightest and best when installed?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
11/1/2007
This board is sponsored by the Metal Roofing Alliance, a coalition of metal roofing manufacturers and suppliers. Metro is a member. We are all strong believers in metal roofing. It seems to me that your questions are very specific to Metro ... there is no one better to answer them than the good folks at Metro. I would suggest emailing Peter Croft with Metro at [email protected]
Brian Selig
Architectural Building Components Metal Roof and Wall Panels
11/2/2007
http://www.metroroofproducts.com/taxcredit.html On the Metro site, they say that their white coating satisfies EnergyStar. I think the more serious question you are asking is: Does your contractor know what he is talking about? Make sure that you have to support that your product meets the IRS code. Metal shingles are light. These are probably 1 lb/SF. The alternatives are certainly heavier. Lighter colors are more reflective. Metal shingles allow a good portion of the product to be seperated from the deck, allowing less radiant heat to transfer from the shingle to the deck. If you are concerned with your contractor, have him provide some references for you to look at. For the product to perform properly, it must be installed correctly. I assume that you don't want to do this again if you are using metal.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
11/4/2007
For weight comparisons, here are some approximate numbers per 100 square feet: Aluminum -- 45 Steel -- 80 - 125 Copper -- 100 Zinc -- 110 Low end asphalt -- 275 Laminated shingles -- 350 - 425 Concrete -- 500 - 600 Wood shakes -- 400 - 600 Clay tile -- 900 - 2000 Slate -- 1000 - 1200
Guest User
11/6/2007
Thanks for your help. I e-mailed Peter Croft and determined that, as Brian says, their Pearl White coating satisifies Energy Star. However, that would not look well on my house which is a small Cape Cod/Ranch Style built in 1942. It is presently painted Cape Cod blue and has some white siding and trim. The current roof is brick red. I thought, and my contractor agreed that the Birch color would look the best. It is rather dark - almost a charcoal grey. If I changed the paint color in the future, I'd probably go with all white or a nice shade of grey. I bought the house in 1981 and have no problems with the existing roof other than it is old and needs to be replaced. Lots of shingles have blown off when it has been windy and I don't want to wait until there is a leak or an emergency. On the other hand, I certainly do not want to have any problems with a new roof!!! Trying to determine which materials are going to meet Energy Star requirements and/or qualify for the tax credit is very confusing. I thought it would be very simple, as in shopping for appliances such as refrigerators...but that does not seem to be the case. It would be nice to get a tax credit, but I am as much if not more concerned about making any home improvements as "green" as possible and want to make the wisest choice I can since this is a big expense and not one that will be done again for a number of years. When the time comes to sell, I'd like to be able to think the roof would enhance the resale value. The sales rep. from the roofing company gave me an information sheet about the tax credit and said this Birch would qualify and he seems to know what he is talking about. The company does quite a lot of business with Metro Roofs. Brian, the sales rep. just came by this afternoon with some references and I will call them this evening. He will be back tomorrow so I will appreciate any further input you may have. You are right in that I would not plan to be doing re-roofing again or for a long time. I would certainly hope this company knows what they are doing and would do the correct installation. I have no plans to sell my home in the near future and would hope that if my plans should change, that whatever roof would be in good condition and enhance the re-sale value. What do you think Donald Trump would do??? LOL!
Brian Selig
Architectural Building Components Metal Roof and Wall Panels
11/7/2007
https://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=roof_prods.pr_roof_products Here's where that list is. If you are comfortable with your contractor, then you are set. Buying green to me means: 1) Using proucts that reduce energy consumption and installing them in a manner that maximizes their effectiveness 2) Using products made with recycled content that can be recycled again when their useful life is over If you are using metal panels, you are achieving #2. #1 is up to your contractor. Minimize radiant heat transfer and maximize ventilation. If white will not work, consider the lightest possible option for enhanced reflectivity. Here is an example of reflectivity by color: http://www.archmetalroof.com/chart/chart.htm
Guest User
12/1/2008
Thanks for all your help. It has been one year since my metal roof was installed and I just wanted to let you know how thrilled I am with it. The contractor did an excellent job and we had a lot of heavy rain shortly after the job was completed last year. There were absolutely no problems with it. I decided to go with the Metro Shake II Birch, despite it not qualifying for the tax credit. It was good to know that it is considered to be a "green product" as that was one of the primary considerations.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
12/3/2008
Wonderful!
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