Guest User
3/7/2007
I am building a lake home and the plan called for a standing seam roof. The materials were ordered from a company called Georia Metal. I have confirmed with this supplier that the product is designed to eliminate all fasteners and screws by using an interlocking system underneath the panel. The problem we ave is that the installer decided to place two(2) large sheet metal screws about 2-3" above the drip panel at the bottom of each panel. This has created excessive oil-panning as well as buckled edges along the top of bottom of the roof line. Additionally, the installer did not use factory edges in many cases so the exposed edges are at both the bottom of the panel where they crewed ot down as well as back up in the rake where it is less visible. The combination of the sheared edges, along with the screwed panels, has created a barn quality of finish. I would greatly appreciate your comments on the following installation practices for standing seam roofs: 1) Is it normal to have screws exposed at the bottom of each panel right above the drip panel? I understood that the whole idea behind such systems were to eliminate the fasteners and screws and create a floating panel that is secured via the interlocking system underneath. The metal supplier has confirmed that this is the intended application. However, they are also suggested that screws would also be acceptable. I contend that they would not. 2) Is it common to have rough cut edges, they used tin snips and a skill saw on the job, exposed at the bottom of the panel right above the drip panel? Again, I understood that intent of this product to create a continuous factory edge at the gutter line. The edges are exposed, overlapping, uneven, and rusting over one week after install. 3) Is it reasonable to assume that a standing seam, interlocking clip system, would be free of exposed screws and fasteners? 4) Are tin snips and a skill saw the proper tools for installation? It looks like the builder is going to step up and replace the roof. I would appreciate your feedback also. Thanks, Robert King 678-778-1737
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
3/7/2007
1) One end of the panels should be "pinned" with through fasteners to keep the panels from sliding. Normally this done at the peak so the screws are not visible. 2) Cutting should be done neatly with snips or power shears. It is not unusual to have to cut the panel ends. However, it should be done neatly and never with a saw which leaves a jagged rust prone edge. 3) There should not be many visible fasteners. Not out of the question to have a few rivets or screws visible on complex flashing areas but generally there shouldn't be any. 4) See #2. I hope this helps. I do not believe that Georgia Metal is an MRA member, unfortunately. All Best.
Guest User
9/5/2008
please advise me the proper method of hemming the bottom edge to the drip edge is there a tool available to cut the ribs in one snip
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
9/10/2008
You could check with your roofing manufacturer to see if they offer a guillotine profiled for your panel. Something like a MultiMate tool can be used for hemming the bottom edge. However, heavily profiled vertical panels may be difficult to hem.
Guest User
11/27/2008
Firestone's uniclad system is designed in that way, if you get on there website they have complete instructions on how to hem the bottom over the eave. You need a special style of eave, it's called a style d eave.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
11/27/2008
Thanks.
Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.