Eave Flashing Vs Extended Eave Flashing

Guest User
10/19/2002
Is extended eave flashing generally used if gutters will be installed, and regular eave flashing used when no gutters will be installed? What is the general usage for each? I need to make sure I'm measuring correctly for metal panels: This application is for a 4/12 pitch simple roof with a gable on each end and no vented ridge. Do I simply measure from the eave to the ridge and take off about 1/2 inch to make sure I won't have to cut panels off? What type ridge cover is preferred and/or easier to install - Zbar with ridge cover or foam closure with ridge cover? We are planning to use 16 inch wide, 26 gauge standing seam panels. Thanks!
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
10/19/2002
I assume by now your contractor completed your project an you are now getting ready for a do it yourself on your friends house. I strongly reccommend that you get the instalation instructions on the panel of choice from the manufacturer. As well talk to the distributor and ask what most contractors use and what he carries. This is typically the most practical and economical detail and proven for your area.
Guest User
10/21/2002
Thanks Al! My contractor has not completed our project - waiting on one piece of ridge cover. I received an Image II Installation Guide for our roof panels after requesting one 4 times over a 4 week period. After reading through this Installation Guide twice, I've found that our contractor got more wrong than right, but that's another story. Yes, I'm getting ready to help some dear friends install metal panels over just the part of their house that is leaking. This home was built in the late 1800's, in Virginia City, Montana. We made measurement yesterday, and it turns out to be more complicated than I originally thought. It has a rock fireplace through this part of the roof. I have a lot of homework and study before even ordering the metal roof panels. Like most of the older homes in this little town, the roofs sag towards the middle. I had this project on my mind while trying to sleep last night, so I woke up several times with different ideas. I'm thinking of leaving the old T-Lock shingles and running horizontal 2x4s from gable to gable, but shimming them towards the middle to compensate for the sag, in the old roof. Then place high density rigid polyurethane panels between these 2x4s. Not yet sure how to fill in sagging part so it's even with the rest of the roof. Maybe I can use spray in polyurethane below the rigid foam in the sagging areas. Still thinking. The existing roof has tonge and groove vaulted ceiling below, with only 2x6 rafters and 6 inches of insulation. Not nearly enough insulation, so the rigid insulation will help some. I contacted my friend back east that is the plant manager for an ABC/MBCI facility, and he gave me a contact at the SLC, Utah plant. I have the Installation Manuals. I will take your advice and ask both the manufacturer and distributor pertinent questions. This old home has gutters, so we will probably use the extended eave flashing, unless the manufacturer or distributor advises, otherwise. Thanks again, Mark
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
10/22/2002
Couple of items for consideration. If you spray foam in place it creates its own air barrier on the outside skin as it forms which is good and bad. You want to make sure that the foam is thick enough such that it is at least 40% of the total R factor. That is if there is 6" of fiberglass now or an R20 yo need to add an R12 value in the foam. The reasoning is that the dew point crossing in an insulated non vented assembly in cold weather climates is about 40% into the assembly. As there is probably no air barrier to the inside, the warm air will attempt to move out, condensate at this estimated point in the assembly and could lead to rot. The foam should get you close to an R8 per inch so you would need at least 1 1/2 inch. I would still recommend an a 1" min air chamber that you could vent and a good moisture barrier. I restored a similar house by running a string line from top to bottom and cutting new rafters over the old, then had it foamed in and ran horizontal strapping and the new roof which made an excellant assembly. Flashing in around a stone chimney is a challenge in anyones book. The best general advice I have is to ensure a good path for the water away from it all around especially the top. Spray the area 8" above all around with a good siliconized water seal. Run a 2x4 on edge as a curb around and bent the roof sheets up at least 3 1/2" against the 2x4 which helps deflect any wate.r Seal the corners with an epdm tape then form a "Z" counterflashing that sits on the 2x4 and runs up the stone abour 2" with a gum edge (slight 1/2" bend out and then fill with a high quality 2 part caulking.l
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