P2000 insulation as underlayment/insulation/vapur barrier

Guest User
1/11/2007
I'm curious as to your knowledge of P2000 insulation as underlayment to a metal roof. I have been told that I could install 3/8" P2000 insulation across the roof trusses, then strap across the top of the insulation with 2x4" on 16" centers (this would eliminate the need of Plywood decking and felt). The metal roof would install down on the strapping, and the P2000 inulsation works both as a insulator and a vapour barrier ..mainly as a reflector of heat ...worried however about a reflective material such as P2000 insulation under a metal roof and if I would have proper ventalation. BTW, the roof is a gambrel style of roof
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
1/13/2007
If this is a residential job, I would not do this unless you have extremely good ventilation. I think you'd just be asking for condensation issues
Guest User
11/22/2007
I've spoken at length with P2000 people about something like this and apparently there's no problem with condensation with 3/8 or thicker but possibly with the 1/4 product. I have two layers of 5/8 inch over the entire ceiling of my house with strapping below that and sheetrock over the strapping and there's no problem at all. I have better results insulation wise than 12 inches of fiberglass bat, yet I have just 1.25 inches of P2000 - amazing product.
Guest User
12/11/2007
Greg, i have a story and a half house and i was thinking of doing the same thing on my ceiling. I was going to put 2 layers of 5/8 at right angels to each other to totally seal the seams on the insulation. Also I was going to insulate the cavity between the studs with R12. Do iI have to strap the ceiling before putting on the sheetrock or can I go right over top the p2000? Do you think I will have condensation problems with the roof being unvented? The reason Iam doing this is because I have ice damming problems now. I have 2/8s strapped to the 2/4s for rafters with R20 bats in the cavities with about an 1.5 in of air space but no venting at the bottom of the roof so I don't get enough air movement to get out all the hot air. Do you think this will fix my problem or will I still have to vent the roof if I use p2000? Also I am going to remove the 2/8s and just go with the 2/4s so I won't have any air space.
Guest User
2/12/2008
Kelly you do not have to strap the ceiling and to use 12inch of fiber cavity fill would be a waste of money. but you could use it if you feel that it would be better. fact is the confort level and the insulation power of the p2ooo it would be good to use 3 1/2" or 6" instead just for your saftey concerns. like good health oh yea what good health could come of fiber glass products airborne in your home?. well I guess you will do what you whant but I have 1" only on my ceiling and 5/8" in the wall and I do not see any down fall exept I save more for good efficency and the comfort level is up 5 degrees. that is all I have to say..
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
2/18/2008
Thanks.
Guest User
3/10/2008
Hi Todd, I urge you to become more knowledgeable about P2000. You will be very impressed with the product and you will respond to questions with different answers once you understand the product more. Gary DiMasi at www.4urplace.com is an excellent resource. good Insulating and saving money!
Guest User
5/1/2008
Actually P2000 is perfect for floors, wals, ceilings, concrete floors, commercial, residential, and agricultural. P2000 doesn't allow for any condesation. Check this out...... Performance Veiw the P2000 Video The P2000 Insulation System is a new super-efficient thermal insulation product that delivers outstanding insulation protection in a one inch board. It's tested! It's approved! And it works! People believe that a well-insulated wall has to be a thick wall. With The P2000 Insulation System, that is no longer the case. Instead of relying on thick layers of insulation to absorb heat and slow down thermal transfer, The P2000 Insulation System has combined the physics of thermal reflective technology with the insulating power of a dense EPS foam core (similar to the foam coffee cup you have trusted for years) to produce unparalleled insulating performance. Independent laboratory tests proved that 5/8" of P2000 outperforms 6" of fibreglass insulation plus vapour barrier. If the R-Value of 6" of fibreglass is R20, then what is the R-Value of 5/8" of P2000? P2000 is also easy to handle, cut and install, and so versatile that it can be applied to an endless variety of insulation projects. Personal Field Study FIELD STUDY 1” P2000 INSULATION SYSTEM VS R 20, 6”FIBREGLASS Miniature buildings with identical interior dimensions (23” wide X 34” long X 27” high). Both buildings are heated with a 100 watt light bulb and are constructed to National Building Code standards. The fiberglass building is 2X6 construction. The P2000 building is 2X4 construction. 2 X6 Fibreglass Building Six inch R 20 fibreglass insulation complete with a 6 mil poly vapour barrier was installed on the inside of the walls and the ceiling. Note# In order to observe the performance of the insulation a (TEMPORARY) exterior layer of poly was installed. The poly held the insulation in place and protected the fibreglass insulation from the weather. There was no exterior OSB installed at this time. The building was set on one inch R-5 extruded polystyrene insulation. 2 X4 P 2000 Building 1” P 2000 was installed with no vapor barriers. There was no exterior OSB installed. The building was set on a one inch piece of P2000. Observations Nov 10 / 2006 Outside temperature -3 C. Two miniature buildings were constructed indoors. Buildings were moved outdoors. The small 12” X 12” windows in both buildings were facing the sun (south). The heat was activated (100 watt light bulb) in both buildings. In 25 minutes the P 2000 building reached 25C. Fibreglass building required 2 hours & 44 minutes (six times longer) to achieve the same interior temperature as the P 2000 building. Observations Nov 14 / 2006 Outside temperature + 4C to -6C Day windy 25 KPH gusting. Night no measurable wind. Fibreglass Building: After three days condensation was noticeable on the inside of the exterior vapour barrier. When windy the fibreglass building’s temperature was 10C colder than the P 2000 building. Average night temperature (no wind) in the fiberglass building was 3 to 5C warmer than the P 2000 building. P 2000 Building: No condensation formed. Wind had little to no effect on the P 2000 building. Daytime temperature was 10C warmer than the fiberglass building. Observations Nov 30 / 2006 Outside temperature -14C / 10 to 15 KPH Winds Fibreglass Building: Exterior vapour barrier was removed. Fibreglass insulation was frozen to the vapour barrier. No other moisture was apparent in the fibreglass insulation. Building was left without outside vapour barrier for one day. Temperature dropped (10C) without exterior vapour barrier. P 2000 Building: The P 2000 building was 10C warmer than the fibreglass building after the exterior barrier was removed from the fiberglass building. Observations Dec 1 / 2006 Installed 7/16 OSB on both buildings. No temperatures recorded. Observations Both Buildings Dec 6 / 2006 4:45 PM Outside temperature -17C Light WindInterior Temp. P 2000 Building 22CInterior Temp. Fiberglass Building 19C9:30 PM Outside temperature -22C Light Wind Interior Temp. P 2000 Building 20C Interior Temp. Fiberglass Building 17C Observations Dec 7 / 2006 6:45 A.M Outside temperature -25 Wind Gusting to 50 KMH Fiberglass Building: Heat source was shut off for approximately two hours. One section of the OSB was removed. Condensation in the fiberglass insulation was apparent. OSB was re-installed. When the heat source was re-activated the interior temperature was -5C. The fiberglass building required over 9 hours to achieve an interior temperature of 15C. P 2000 Building: Heat source was shut off for approximately two hours. Conventional thinking suggests radiant barriers do not perform (reflect radiant heat) when covered by a conductive surface such as drywall. Removed the P 2000 building from platform and installed ½” drywall directly over the P 2000 on the walls and ceiling. i.e.: There was no air space between the P 2000 and drywall. Re-installed the P 2000 building on the platform. When the heat source was re-activated, the interior temperature was -25C. The P 2000 building recovered (40 C) in approximately one third the time it took the fiberglass building to recover (10C). Observations Both Buildings Dec 8 / 06 7:10 AM Outside temperature -9C Light Wind Interior Temp. P 2000 Building 19C Interior Temp. Fiberglass Building 17C 7:00 PM Outside temperature -11C No Wind Interior Temp. P 2000 Building 25C Interior Temp. Fiberglass Building 25C Both Buildings March 2 / 07 Outside temperature -10 Light Wind and Sunny The heat source was turned off in both buildings. The sun was shining directly on both buildings. The P 2000 building maintained an interior temperature of 15C while the fiberglass building maintained an interior temperature of 6C. Overall Observations The buildings were monitored sporadically for the balance of the winter. Relative to the outside temperature the overall trend was consistent with the above observations. Whenever the heat source was turned off and then re-activated the P 2000 building achieved the desired interior temperature 5-10 times faster than the fiberglass building. With or without an exterior barrier or sheathing the fiberglass building was adversely affected by wind. The interior temperature of the P2000 building was virtually unaffected by wind. The fibreglass building developed condensation in the wall and ceiling cavity while the P 2000 building showed no signs of condensation anywhere. In sunny moderate winter temperatures (-10C to 0C ) the P 2000 building was able to maintain an average interior temperature of 10 to 15C while the fiberglass building averaged an interior temperature of only 3C to 6C. When the outside temperature ranged between -8C to +5C with no wind and no sun the interior temperature the fiberglass building was 2 to 3C warmer than the P 2000 building. Overall the P 2000 building maintained a significantly warmer interior temperature than the fibreglass building. Significantly less time was required to install the P2000 Insulation system than the fiberglass insulation, vapour barrier, vapour box, stapling and acoustic sealing. Angela Pronti Manager FireProof Paints & Products 1764 Empire Blvd., Suite 9 Webster, New York 14580 Phone: 585-787-9302 x 18 Fax: 585-267-5218
Guest User
5/14/2008
Where can I buy P2000 ?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
5/29/2008
Contact the manufacturer
Guest User
7/19/2008
Would you use P2000 in a post and frame metal building that will have residential use for part of the building? I do not plan to insulate the wall or roof cavaties. Which product would you use on the roof? Which on the exterior sides? Does the P2000 go directly on the roof trusses with purlins nailed on top of the P2000 or is the P2000 nailed to the purlins and girts? Building location is middle TN. thanks
Guest User
8/15/2008
Hi Frank, We have P2000 for sale. 877-539-0703
Guest User
10/4/2008
P2000 Excellent Product. Please call with Questions or Purchasing PH# 515-577-2774
Guest User
11/19/2008
Due to hurricane Ike, I am embarking on the installation of a metal roof, do to the amount of money my insurance is giving me to replace my asphault shingles, I am going with a R panel. My plan of atack is this, remove the old shingles repair the decking that is damaged with osb, for underlayment I am looking at the Titanium UDL-30. Now the concern is do I place the P2000 on top of the underlayment or under it. And what about crush factor when securing the R panels down? Do I need to put some strip or battens on top of the P2000 to fasten the R panels to?? Thanks Paul.
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