Pete Sliwa
9/25/2006
I am in the middle of a metal roof installation and experiencing oil canning. It's a mill finish, standing seam (nail strip) roof. Almost every panel is oil canning. Honestly, it looks like crap. I spoke with my roofing contractor and he states that it is inherent in these roof. I read this online as well. Similar roofs that I looked at do not seem to experience the same amount of oil canning I have. What do I do? Could this be due to improper installation or defective material? How much is too much oil canning? Your help is appreciated.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
9/25/2006
Unfortunately there are no industry standards as yet to determine what is and is not acceptable. If you are not happy, then tell the contractor to stop and have the manufacturers rep come out. You are within your rights to hold money back until it is resolved. Certainly steeper pitches show it more than higher low slope. It can be the steel and/or the machine. Portable site machines require better (flatter)steel than expensive machines in the factory. Also the profile can be more demanding as can the installation and sheet length. Fact is if you are not happy, then have him stop and get it resolved as it will not get better on its own.
Guest User
9/25/2006
Stopping is the best thing to do right now. Oil canning has lot's of causes and your contractor is correct to a certain degree that it can be inherent in any flat metal shape, including a standing seam panel. However, since the panel is nail strip, the application of the fastener into the strip will pull the panel tightly to the roof deck. If the deck is "out of plane" then this connection will definitely cause the panel to exhibit oil canning. Have your installer check the roof deck. It is easy top do and, more than likely, the panel manufacturer is going to recommend the same thing
Guest User
9/25/2006
Hi I would like to use a metal roof that has a zinc finish on a barn I am building. One end of it has a cone which intersects a 12/12 pitch truss type roof. For this reason I was thinking of a smaller shingle unit that would form around the cone. Do you have any thoughts on this and any reccomendations for material? thanks ian
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
9/26/2006
I do not know of any metal shingles that will readily form around a cone. Some do have hand made tapered shingles made but the cost is expensive. Most take the dimmensions to a sheet metal shop and have them form tapered sheets to fit.
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