Guest User
5/26/2001
I have an A-frame house that currently has cedar shakes approx 30 years old. Here are some questions about the metal shakes. 1) Can snow/ice guards be installed? With the steep pitch and a slick surface, I have concerns that snow would build up then avalanche to the gutters, perhaps causing damage to the gutters and ice dams. 2) Do the panels come in sheets or individual shakes? The top of my roof extends 4 feet out farther from the house than the bottom of the roof. If panels are used, will the contractor have to cut down the length of the panels at an angle? 3) Are the panels mold/mildew proof (not just resistent, but proof)? One side of the house faces generally north and we live in a wooded area. The current shakes have moss growing on them. 4) And finally...I will need to remove the current cedar shakes when having the new roof installed. Can I burn them in the fireplace or might there be toxins that would be hazardous? I have not treated the shakes in the 5 years I have owned the house. thanks and great site!!
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
5/26/2001
Great questions! Thanks! Here are my answers: 1) Yes, various types of snowguards can be installed to help break up the snow as it slides from the roof. Consult with your roofing contractor and the roofing manufacturer in determining which type of snowguard will be best for your situation. 2) Most metal shake products come in "modular" panels ranging from heights of 10 inches up to 15 inches and widths from 24 inches to 60 inches. The panels are installed in a prescribed staggered fashion so that continuous vertical lines on the roof are avoided, for a more natural appearance. Most products do offer special "flared gable" trims for situations like yours where the ridge is wider than the eave. Be sure to use a trim that will not trap tree leaves, ice, snow, etc. as they slide down the roof. 3) Metal roofing is very resistant to fungus and mildew. However, there are situations, especially when tree sap lands on the roof and then it supports mold or mildew, when some dirt accumulation can be visible on metal roofs. If desired, it can be cleaned. In any event, whether it is cleaned or not, it will not damage the roof system. This is not the case with other roofing materials. And, again, as a general rule, metal roofing is very resistant to such things to begin with. 4) I am not an expert when it comes to burning wood shakes and the possibility of dangerous chemicals or toxins being in them. Generally, though, I'd think this is not the best idea. It might be wise to consult with a cedar shake producer or trade association to find out for sure.
Dick Bus
5/27/2001
I agree with Mr. Miller's answers to your questions. However, I have a comment about the use of snowguards and their use. Snowguards will not hold large volume of snow. I have a metal roof on my two story home and most of the roof is a 12/12 pitch. Snowguards were installed as an architectural detail. The family room roof is 8/12 pitch. Snow accummulates on this roof from the two roofs above and drifting. This roof has a northwest exposure and has very little sun due to the amount and type of trees behind it. It is common to have a five foot drift on this roof area and the rest of the house is clear. Typical snow fall for this area is 30 inches for the year, so we are not in a heavy snow belt. A heavy cast aluminum snowguard was used. The ones on the family room roof were bent over after the first year, which was eleven years ago and I have since removed them. The gutters are made of .032 aluminum, the hangers are made of .050 aluminum and are fastened with two 1 1/2 inch long screws, 16 inches on center. The gutters are still secure. I would recommend that you look at the fastening of the gutters, rather than rely on snowguards to prevent any damage to the gutters. Thanks for the great questions.
Guest User
5/29/2001
I would like to know the cost per square; metal/aluminum roof as opposed to ashfalt shingles. And also, the difference in cost of installation by a contractor. Thank you.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
6/1/2001
Metal roofing is, generally, a higher investment than conventional shingles. However, there are so many variables involved that it's pretty much impossible to estimate a price without being on the job and doing a complete analysis. The many factors include current roof condition and type (can tear-off be avoided by using a low weight metal roof?), roof pitch, roof configuration, roof size, and the type of metal roof you're selecting. My advice is to use the MRA website (www.metalroofing.com) to determine what style of metal roof you'd like, and to then contact the manufacturer(s) of that style so that they can put you in contact with a local dealer/installer who can visit your home and evaluate your needs. The real value of metal roofing goes far beyond its cost by including its many benefits: Long-life durability, Low weight, Fire Safety, Energy efficiency, Beauty, and Wind resistance. When considering roofing for your home, keep in mind that you don't have to buy "just another roof" but you can instead chooce to spend your money on a more durable and beautiful roofing choice -- metal!
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