Aivars Berzins
5/21/2006
Hi, My home has a 2/12 pitch 3500sqft roof with 4 valleys and a large amount of cathederal ceilings. These areas of cathederal ceilings have no ventilation under the roof and also no vapour barrier on the warm side of the insulation. As a result, my roof shingles are very curled and I also have ice dam issues in the winter. I recently had a steel roofing contractor come over and give me an estimate on installing the roof. He is a very established installer with many years of experience - and this is what he suggested. 1. He would attach a "foil type" 1/4inch insulation (claims r10) on top of the shingles on the cathederal part of the roof. His intent is to increase the insulation value in these areas. 2. Then install the steel roofing (a rib type with 3/4inch high ribs) directly on the roof. No ventilation, solid ridge caps - but the soffet ends of the ridges would be open for some air flow. My concerns are: 1. The foil insulation will trap moisture between the foil and the roof deck - therefore rotting out the roof deck. 2. The lack of ventilation between the shingles and the steel roof will still result in ice dams. I feel this contractor doesn't grasp the ventilation issues I face with my roof. I am considering putting the roof on myself. and was going to : 1. Buy a steel roof product from a company in Ottawa that is applicable down to a 2/12 pitch. 2. Install 1 x3inch boards vertically right on the shingles (to provide a 1 inch air gap), then 1x4 inch boards horizontally to mount the steel roof to. 3. Ventilate at the soffits and the ridge. I realize that this is just a bandaid solution to the minimal insulation and lack of ventilation issue for this roof - but it will at least help? Can you please advice if I'm on the right track OR should I follow the lead of the contractor? Sorry for the long-winded question! Sincerely, AB
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
5/21/2006
Your idea is very good and, to me, is better than what the contractor is proposing.
Guest User
5/21/2006
Hi Todd, Thank you for your reply and advice. I am comfortable with installing my own steel roof, as I have done it before on "lean to' type roofs. But I have never done any valley work using steel roofing and am concerned about my lack of experience. Is valley work really that difficult? I'm assuming that I just lay the valley metal down, then cut the roofing panels to the appropriate angle (using tin snips) to correspond to the valley. Then I attach\screw down the steel panel - and maybe use some butene(sp?) tape where the roofing panel meets the valley. In this correct? Thanks again, Aivars PS Could I assume the metal roofing supplier (in Ottawa) would provide me with specific instructions?
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
5/21/2006
What you have described is a common way of doing valleys. Some panels can also have the panel ends bent into the valley. Ideal will indeed be able to give you full instructions, I am sure.
Guest User
5/23/2006
Todd, Thank you for your help! Aivars Berzins
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
5/23/2006
You are welcome.
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