energy star underlayment to use with stone coated steel shakes

Guest User
5/8/2006
I have a old heavy wood shake roof that needs replacing. It has skip sheathing. I will be removing the old wood shake and using a synthetic underlayment like Titanium UDL. Duroloc with be the metal product and the roofer installs with wood batts. Question. I would like the maximum energy star rating from my resulting roofing system and I think I should also use A Micro-E (foil-polyetheylene 1/8 thick rolls) underlayment right over the Titanium to give me max heat reflective performance. It this overkill
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
5/10/2006
As president of Dura-loc, we do not recommend it as the roof will emmitt most of the heat. Make sure they counterbatten the roof vertically over first and vent the air chamber and this takes the balance of the heat away while acting as an insulation blanket in cooler wheather.
Guest User
5/11/2006
My company recently installed a Gerard Canyon Shake (stone-coated steel) roof over a 28-year old jumbo cedar shake roof (some as thick as 2"). We have installed Dura-Loc over medium shakes in the past. Leaving the wood on your roof allows you to retain the insulating value of the wood, save the cost of a tear-off, and keep the material out of a land fill. Simply lay down two layers of Elk's VersaShield before you sleeper the roof and be sure to cut back the shakes several inches from the eave so that your fascia and rake trim metal lay flat. I would be happy to email pictures. ([email protected])
Guest User
5/11/2006
I have to disagree with Mr. Reid on this one. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has a substantial amount of data from testing radiant barrier systems. Radiant energy transfer happens through conduction, convection, and radiation. The stone-coated steel system will reduce conduction substantially because it is elevated from the roof deck and will not directly transfer the heat of the metal to the deck. Stone-coated steel will also reduce convection substantially because of the airflow under the panels (especially when you use sleepers/counter-battens) from the eave to the ridge (hot air rises) keeps the airspace from getting warm enough to transfer much heat through the deck. However, radiation (a band of electromagnetic waves) is still a factor when it comes to the solar spectrum and far-infrared spectrum. A radiant barrier such as aluminum foil which has a .05 emissivity will help control radiation but it is much less effective if it is touching either of the surfaces that are trying to transfer heat (the panel and the deck). Your best bet would be to install a radiant barrier on top of the sleepers instead of direct-to-deck. Your second best option would be to install a radiant barrier in your attic. Regards, -Mike Poole [email protected]
Guest User
5/16/2006
Thanks all and thanks Mike Heavy wood shake removal, considering Duraloc product, alternatively considering Tamko Lamarite slate look product I am also alternately considering the slate synthetic Tamko Lamarite product. Again, I will strip off the old, heavy wood shakes. but I am worried about heat entry into my roof/attic area with this product. I really like the look but don't want the any added heat entry -----yes, I will use additional ventilation, continuous ridge venting, etc. but I dont want any increase in my A/C cooling load Does the Florida (hot weather) experts have an answer for me as to how to get as close as possible to a "cool roof" even with the Lamarite product--or at least have no worse than my present shake roof. Am I asking too much?? thanks guys
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
5/23/2006
Lamarite is a non-metal product and I really do not know much about it. I am a strong believer in ventilation though and it sounds like you have that aspect well covered.
Guest User
11/16/2007
Do you mean to lay purlins horizontally (across the trusses) over the deck (or,as in my case, over the old asphalt shingles) and then lay some vertically, across the first set of purlins, as well? If so, at what intervals?
Guest User
11/16/2007
Are counter-battens (or sleepers) the same as pulins?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
12/1/2007
Metal roofs that can be installed on battens virtually always require that the battens run horizontally. However. applying vertical cross battens first will create an air chamber that is ventable from eave to ridge.
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