Guest User
1/3/2006
Hello, I recently purchased a farm in Canada that has a metal horse barn and I am having problems with condensation when the temperature gets around freezing. The barn houses 20 horses and is approximately 150 feet by 60 feet. The barn has a metal roof with 4 large whirly birds at the top, it also seems to have good air vents along the facia (3 inches the length of the barn on both sides) The problem seems to be the metal ceiling that was put in at about 12 feet high covering the whole barn (think this was done to prevent birds from getting in the rafters). When I moved in, there was no ventilation at all from the main area to the area above the ceiling. I put 5 small (3 inch by 10 inch) vents in the ceiling to make some air flow happen, this helped a bit I think but it did not solve my problem. There is no insulation or vapour barrier anywhere on this barn. This is only a problem when the temperature gets around freezing when the doors are all shut up relatively tight. (Unfortunately we can’t keep the doors open in the winter). Questions: Do I put more vents in the ceiling? Do I get an exhaust fan (powered or not)? If yes, do I put the fan above the metal ceiling or below and is there a formula that you can use to determine the size of the fan? I am not sure if the goal should be to move the colder air from above the ceiling down to below the ceiling or should I be trying to get the warm air below the ceiling out the side of the building or up above the metal ceiling? Thanks appreciate your advice
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
1/4/2006
You have a situation with moist air below the ceiling and a heat source with the horses. There will be temperature differances above and below the ceiling which will cause condensation. If you place some insulation above the ceiling, it will help stop the temperature differances that cause condensation but it may also just move the temperature point where the condensation happens. If you choose this option, you should use an insulation that is moisture proof (not fiberglass as if wet it will recat to the metal). Alternately you could look to line the underside of the ceiling with a relective barrier. There are a number of them out there that go as thin as 1/4" that have a low perm rate if you tape the joints. They typically come in rolls and are available at the Home Depot etc where they sell them for duct coverings. I would try a small section to see how it performs. I know Environmentally Friendly Products, one of of our supplier members manufactures this product.
Guest User
1/4/2006
Ouch, that does not sound like it is kind of expensive and hard to do. Do you believe I can solve it any other way ?
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
1/5/2006
Ventilate until the temperatures are equal above an below the ceiling.
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