Guest User
8/26/2002
I recently bought a 7 year old log home with panel metal roof. It has a vaulted pine ceiling in which water leaks from the knotts at various places when there is a heavy rain accompanied by strong winds. It appears that some of the foam sealing strips have come out of the ridge cap, otherwise there is no visible problem with the roof itself. Is the fix as simple as replacing the foam sealing strips? Is it fairly standard to not use sheathing and felt across the entire roof (at least I assume this is how it was constructed since water is dripping from all across the ceiling at various times and under differing conditions)? Does the fact that the leaking can be so wide spread suggest that other problems may exist? Thanks for your help.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
8/27/2002
Not knowing the exact type of roof system and the assembly makes commenting difficult. If you do have a vertical seam metal panel sytem and the closure strips are misplaced you can expeience water penetration from the wind, moreso from the siphoning action on the downwind side. You could then have the water follwing rafters, strapping etc and comming in everywhere. I am concerned as the building codes call for a moisture barrier under any roofing material which should act as a secondary membrane in your situation whivh is obviously not happening. I would definitely contact the builder and see if he would do anything or at least advise you on the assembly, the roofing contractor and the material manufacturer. You should also be able to go to the building department who should have a set of drawings on file and get a copy. I would be pleased to offer some assistance if you would like to e mail me directly where I could request more information. Lets hope trhat it is a simple fix as if it continues it will damage your insulation and rot could set into the wood.
Guest User
9/27/2002
I have a log cabin with a vaulted ceiling and a vertical metal roof that has been leaking for years - everywhere. The construction is rafters, tongue and groove pine, 2" insulation with foil against the pine, then the strapping and then the metal roof. The main roof is 9x12 with a piggy back porch roof which is 4x12. The pine in the porch roof is completely stained and there are stain marks on the 9x12 roof pine. I have replaced the transition metal where the porch roof lays on the main roof. There is nothing between where the sections of metal overlap(felt?)I have had 3 or 4 contractors and they don't have a clue. Please advise on how to or who could at least diagnose this problem for me. My log cabin is in northern New York.
Guest User
9/27/2002
I have a log cabin with a vaulted ceiling and a vertical metal roof that has been leaking for years - everywhere. The construction is rafters, tongue and groove pine, 2" insulation with foil against the pine, then the strapping and then the metal roof. The main roof is 9x12 with a piggy back porch roof which is 4x12. The pine in the porch roof is completely stained and there are stain marks on the 9x12 roof pine. I have replaced the transition metal where the porch roof lays on the main roof. There is nothing between where the sections of metal overlap(felt?)I have had 3 or 4 contractors and they don't have a clue. Please advise on how to or who could at least diagnose this problem for me. My log cabin is in northern New York.
Guest User
9/27/2002
I have a log cabin with a vaulted ceiling and a vertical metal roof that has been leaking for years - everywhere. The construction is rafters, tongue and groove pine, 2" insulation with foil against the pine, then the strapping and then the metal roof. The main roof is 9x12 with a piggy back porch roof which is 4x12. The pine in the porch roof is completely stained and there are stain marks on the 9x12 roof pine. I have replaced the transition metal where the porch roof lays on the main roof. There is nothing between where the sections of metal overlap(felt?)I have had 3 or 4 contractors and they don't have a clue. Please advise on how to or who could at least diagnose this problem for me. My log cabin is in northern New York.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
9/27/2002
First, locate the manufacturer of the product and see if they won't come do an inspection. Beyond that, I would look at the ridge and make sure water isn't gettering in there. Also look again at the transition. I would avoid sealing seams -- that doesn't sound like a good solution. Please feel free to email me photos at [email protected] Thanks.
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