Jim Hutcherson
10/6/2005
The auditotium to our church is now 26 years old. It has a 9/12 pitch and has a vaulted ceiling. The rafters are 2x8's. We need to reroof it soon. This will be the fourth roof in these 26 years. We are located in Temperature Zone #7. We plan to remove the shingles and start from the plywood. We want to then install a standing seam roof. So I have a few questions: 1. What gauge steel should we use? 2. Do we put nailing strips on the plywood so we can get extra ventilation (the roof currently has a ridge vent)? 3. Are Ridge vents likely to leak? 4. Should we get a contractor that makes or fabricates the panels on site or would it be better if the roofing is shipped already precut? 5. Are most most manufacturers "energy star" compliant? 6. Are there any other alliances that are recognized in this industry?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/6/2005
The Metal Construction Association has a Certified Metal Roofing Panel program. You may wish to ask manufacturers if they meet the requirementrs of this program. As far as battens or not, it really depends upon the metal roof you choose. Most residential systems need to be installed over solid decking. If you do choose a product that can be installaed over battens, you can obtain greater energy efficiency by vertical battens followed by horizontal battens and then venting this airspace between the decking and the new roofing. As far as gauge, that is just one indicator of the quality of a product. Others are coating, and panel design/engineering. Generally, as with most things in life, you get what you pay for. Make sure the ridge vent being used is approved by the roofing manufacturer. Ridge vents can be a very good way to successfully vent a roof system. Many companies are energy star compliant on their lighter colors. A few companies are using darker colors with reflective pigment. Right now, the industry gauges energy efficiency pretty much strictly upon the reflectivity of the coating on the roofing. As far as jobsite vs plant manufacturing ... I always feel that plant manufacturing is more controlled and is generally a better way to go. However, are there good people running good machines for jobsite fabrication? Absolutely. You just have to find them. All Best.
Guest User
10/6/2005
Thanks Todd, I appreciate your feedback. I now have one more question. Is there a way to measure the thickness of tin when the smaller the number the thicker the product. If a mic is used, is there a conversion available so as to tell what the tin thickness really is? And now another question; is there a standard width for tin panels? Thanks, Jim
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/6/2005
There are standard widths for panels like 5V Crimp and R Panel. I am not sure what those widths are as my company does not produce that type of product. I think they are often around 39". I think that maybe it would be helpful for you to know a bit about the full range of metal products available today. I have a good article I will be glad to email to you if you email me at [email protected] As far as gauge, I have to tell you that is a real difficult issue. There are so many tolerances and things to take into consideration ana ddifferent companies interpret them differently from what I can tell. The trend in the industry is to start to specify thickness by decimal thickness rather than gauge. If metal thickness is a concern to you, I would suggest that you have the manufacturers tell you what their specified decimal thickness is, not the gauge. Gauge is just too complex and subject to interpretation to be used as a reliable comparison, in my opinion.
Guest User
10/7/2005
Thanks again Todd, My e-mail address is [email protected] Thanks, Jim
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/8/2005
I will get the article sent to you.
Guest User
10/11/2005
Todd, Thanks for the article it was very informative. We are in the process of getting bids from four different contractors and none of them mentioned anything about polymer underlayment. I would like to know more about the polymer underlayment. 1. How does it compare in cost to 30# felt paper? 2. Why is it easier for the contractor to install? 3. Is it similar to Tyvek housewrap - lighter and in larger sized rolls? 4. Does the contractor save significantly on time and labor cost? 5. How is it installed? 6. Our roof is approximately 105 squares. How much more can we expect to pay for this product? Thanks, Jim
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/11/2005
Most of the synthetics are within a range of maybe up to 50% more cost than 30 pound. The synthetics do come on large rolls. Their low weight helps with installation ease. It is installed similar to felt. Expect to pay a tiny bit more than 30-pound but probably not much more. Underlayment is the "small" investment of a metal roof.
Guest User
10/13/2005
Todd, Thanks again for the information. The contractors that I have spoken to thus far, think that synthetic underlayment is overkill. One did say it would cost around five times as much as 30# felt. I apologize but I now have two other questions. First: I did read up on lightning concerns and found out that metal, though it is a conductor of lightning, it does not draw lightning. What would normally happen when lightning hits a metal roof and how would it compare to a hit on an asphalt foof? Does it spread out and because of dispinsation causes less damage? I once heard that a metal roof, if hit by lightning, acts like "slicky slide" and just lets it skirt right off the roof and onto the ground. Is there any truth in this? Second question: Hail - If we were to sustain significant damage, would insurance companies normally replace the metal roof just like they would for a asphalt roof? Thanks, Jim
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
10/13/2005
For my two cents remeber that you are installing a permenat roof system and felts are made of wood chips and asphalt which certainly will age as time passes. As to the lightning, I have witnessed it twice. The metal roof disipates the energy across the roof like a blue blanket. I have seen it loosen the aluminum gutters as it went for grounding through the aluminum and rain but no damage. Conversely when lightning hits any material that has moisture such as trees, wood shingles, concrete tile and even asphalt shingles, the strike instantly boils the moisture and causes the material to explode. As to hail, each company is a little differant. If you buy a tested hail resistant product most insurance companies do provide discounts and certainly aesthetics over damage is something you need to discuss with your agent and know their limitations.
Guest User
10/15/2005
Thanks Allen, This has been very helpful and I am glad I found this sight. Jim
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
10/20/2005
Good luck.
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