new metal roof underlayment and condensation

Guest User
8/3/2005
Hi. I have a 104 year old brick home that I want to put standing seam 26g metal roof on. My roofers want to tear all existing roofing off down to the original decking, then apply felt and then the standing seam metal. I have two questions: 1) after reading your forum, I'm concerned about condensation...what can we do to avoid that? 2) is there a better underlayment than felt...such as rubber, etc.? Thank you.
Guest User
8/3/2005
Here are additional details I should have included: I bought a 104 year old brick home and want to put a standing seam, 26g roof on it - no striations and 16" width. the estimate was $595 per square just to apply the metal but the company is very experienced. I would then have to hire someone locally to tear off existing roofing and prepare it for the application and that would cost a lot too. Total price would be just over $23,000 which is tough to swallow. A local Amish team can do the entire job for $16,000. That is $7,000 savings but I want to make sure they do it right. They are used to applying "barn metal" and screwing it down and standing seam is different. They plan to remove all roofing down to the original decking and make any repairs to decking needed. They want to apply 30lb felt and then the standing seam metal. The more expensive company was going to use a rubber/titanium underlayment instead of felt - is this preferable? Should I encourage my Amish team to use it instead? If yes, where do I purchase it? It sort of looked like a flat bubble wrap. Also, the expensive roofers were going to drill holes in the ridge of the roof and vent it and after reading you forum about condensation problems with metal roofs, I'm wondering if I will have problems if this is not done - my Amish team did not mention it at all. So, my three main issues are:
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
8/4/2005
As an association we can not comment on cost but here are ome points. 1) Make sure whoever does the job that they carry proper workers compensation insurrance and liability insurance. Ask to see copies. This is for your protection in case of an accident. 2) You need to review the entire roof system for proper ventilation. If you have some vaulted areas then you must provide 1" minimum of vertical air movement. This means intakes at the eaves and exhaust at the ridge. If it is an attic, then make sure there are adequate soffit intake vents. The code requires a balanced eave and ridge system to a minimum of 1/150 sf. 3)Figure out why the last roofs have failed. If you have had problems in the past with ice daming at the eaves, then probably you have some heat loss. This means that you should increase the ventilation and look to install an ice and water shield on the lower 3 ft of roof and in the valleys. 4) Assk for details on the type of metal and paint in the system you choose. Ask to see the manufacturers product approval report which will indicate how to install it. Watch that it has a good paint system.
Guest User
8/4/2005
great input. do you have any advice on the underlayment too? They plan to use 30# felt and the other roofing company said their titanium rubber layer is much better.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
8/4/2005
Titanium isn't really a "rubber" product .. it is a polymer-based underlayment ... one of a group of newer underlayments generically referred to as "synthetic underlayments". The upside to these products is durability, lightweight, easy to get on the roof, and they will not "stick" to the back of the metal roofing over time. That "sticking" thing can be a problem when the metal panels expand. The downside is they must be installed strictly according to their manufacturer's specifications. They are also a little mor emoney than felt.
Guest User
8/4/2005
Todd, can you direct me to any manufacturers of the synthetic underlayment? I can then talk to them to see if they believe a crew of roofers who are used to installing felt underlayment would be able to follow the instructions to lay the synthetic one correctly. I do prefer to use it if it is more durable. Thanks for your help. I appreciate it.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
8/4/2005
Some of the primary synthetics are Titanium, SharkSkin, RoofTopGuard, and Tri_Flex 30. There have gotten to be so many of them though that I cannot keep track of them. An internet search for any of these should work.
Guest User
8/4/2005
found it. thanks for all your help.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
8/4/2005
sure
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