Guest User
3/29/2005
Man am I glad I found this site :-) Here is my story. About ten years ago I put one of the first metal roofs in our area on my new home. (I built the house but hired a man who had installed several roofs in the southern part of the state) Well about the third year in. I started having some water leaks wherre the roof changes from a 9/12 pitch to a 4/12 this area covers the front bedrooms and pourch area. Being able to walk on that part of the roof I would go look and find that several screws had backed out. I would be unable to put the screws back in their holes so I would have to seal the hole and put a new screw next to the old hole. I thought this was odd but could deal with the problem. Well now 10 yrs later I have about 12 water spots on my ceiling where the roof is leaking due to screws backing out. All over now even next to the ridge on the 9x12 part. I called the manuf. (One registered with this site and got a ton of run around) They sent a man to look at my house. He told me I should not have used 1x4 lathing I should have decked the house. I should not have used premade trusses as they are not strong and causing my roof to move. Even went as far to tell me the metal I used is not residential. (mine is a 26 gauge metal) Yet when you go to their website it clearly states residential, shows a pic of a building lathed in 1x4's on premade trusses also I come from a family of carpenters so know when this type of smoke is blown in my direction. I finally spoke with an engineer with this company and he could not understand why so many screws werre backing out on me. They did send me a package of oversize #14 screws to go back in the old holes but that is all. My experience with metal roofs has been terrible and if I had it to do over again I am not sure I would. But here is my delimma. I am in the process of building a beautyshop/workshop combo next to my home and want it to match my house, so I am stuck with putting metal on this building. Now do you reccommed decking and felt, lathing or what. The engineer told me that a 1x4 should have more holding power than decking. Local metal sales stores seems to have a it doesn't matter attitude. Also any other advise prior to ordering would be appreciated.........Many Thanks Greg
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
3/29/2005
Greg, I am sorry about your troubles. Very sorry. I am glad you have taken the right step by contacting the manufacturer. There are many things which could cause these screws to do this -- building movement, roofing panel expansion, lumber quality, fastener quality or type or size, etc. There has been a change I have noticed on the part of some manufacturers of through-fastened panels such as yours in recent years in that they do no suggest residential installations be done over solid deck rather than o9ver lathe. Personally, I would look for a standing seam system with concealed fasteners for the new building. Install over solid decking with appropriate underlayment. Concealed fastened panels have allowance for movement and do not typically have problems such as what you have described.
Guest User
3/30/2005
Thanks Todd for the reply, I tired posting this earlier but didn't seem to go through. In your message there was a typo and I am not sure if you meant to say now or not where the "no" is "in recent years in that they do no suggest residential installations be done over solid deck rather than o9ver lathe." Many Thanks Greg
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
3/30/2005
I apologize for the typo. I am a two-fingered typist, albeit a fast one, but that often gets me into trouble. I was trying to say that many of the through-fastened products were designed for non-residential applications and, as such, many of those installations were over lathe. Then, when those products started being used on houses, everyone assumed that installation over lathe would be okay on a house as well. However, today, I believe that most if not all manufacturers of those products call for them to be installed over solid decking and not lathe boards, for residential applications if not all applications.
Guest User
3/31/2005
Thanks again Todd that cleared it up!!! Oh and I understand about the two fingered typist part, I'm there with you :-) Regards Greg
Mark Jefferies
6/19/2005
I have a problem with my standing seam tin roof coming loose. The seams are nailed down to planked roof using the tabs. Four seams in the middle of the roof are loose and the tin is beginning to yield causing leaks. Question one is is this repairable in the middle or does the entire section have to be replaced? Question two is can screws with groumlets be installed through the tin to hold the roof tight? I am worried about screws tearing through. If screws are used what spacing should be used? Thank you.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
6/19/2005
Mark, Any chance at all that you can email some pictures to me? Sometimes, it is important to make sure that we're talking apples and apples before trying to analyze a situation. My email is [email protected]
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