Guest User
1/23/2005
I have an aluminum roof which I like very much with the exception of one thing, that is when snow is abundant the roof sheds it avalanche style right in the middle of my driveway. ice guards were installed on the roof when the new aluminum roof was put on but the first year after installation 90% of the ice guards came down with the avalanches. my question is there a product that can prevent this from happening so I dont have to shovel myself to death removing these roof style avalanches?? my installer guaranteed these will not come off but I have lost almost all of mine, please help. thankyou
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
1/23/2005
I am unsure of the roof sytem type but I am assuming it is a standing seam with concelaed fasteners. These systems sre designed to be fasted down such that the sheets can expand and contract freely through slotted holes. Also the type roof syetm dictates the type of snow bracket along with roof slope, pitch, rafter length and climate. Once you have the right style ofbracket then the quantity required needs to be calculated. Definitely I would gather this information and contact the manufacturer of the roof panel.
Guest User
2/16/2006
This is not a reply but a question for Mr. Reid, Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc. We live near the ocean but on the river in Florida. We have been looking at coated steel (looks like clay tile or wood shakes) tile roofing and aluminum tile roofing. We have been told that both can be installed directly over the shingles. Which is the better product for our use? Would the steel rust? Would either leak if installed correctly? Would appreciate any info Mr. Reid or anyone else can provide.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
2/17/2006
Proper installation is critical to any building product. These systems are not designed to leak. In many cases, going over the old shingles is fine. I would suggest looking into warranty coverage -- there may be some limitations for steel roofing in your area. I don't know. Feel free to email me if you have additional questions. [email protected]
Guest User
3/29/2006
I would never suggest a layover. A homeowner is installing a roof that he will never replace again and that roof begins with dry decking and the underlayment. It is unknown whether the plywood is dry and if not it may lead to mold and a lifetime of allergies. The underlayment is also very important because if the roof fails due to installation the underlayment will not. hopefully. It all depends on the installer.0047
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
3/30/2006
Thanks. I appreciate and respect your input. While, yes, in a perfect world, no lay-overs would probably ever be done, I do think that they can be done successfully on many jobs. Proper attic ventilation, a good underlayment, and proper installation of a metal roof system that is appropriate for the application at hand are all critical. The problem is that, as our industry grows, we continue to face a substantial challenge in terms of education and training, as well as in terms of finding people who are conscientious and care, in order make sure that all of the above things indeed go into a successful roof installation. I really appreciate your input to this forum. It is invaluable.
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