Guest User
1/18/2005
We are in the process of having a metal roof installed. It is the classic rib style, 26 guage. I have noted several problems with the install: 1. He used a jigsaw to cut it, edges are very ragged. Some are exposed, such as on the eyebrows. Also, the cuts are not straight, but look like a snake. 2. On one section of the roof, he pre-measured too short and had to piece it together in order to fit. He states that this is done all the time and nothing is wrong with it. 3. The valleys were cut the same way, very ragged and not straight. 4. No trim whatsoever. 5. No end closures. 6. I had to make him put it on 30# felt, he wanted to use 15. Do I have legitimate complaints?
Guest User
1/18/2005
Pics of this job can be viewed at fttp://webpages.charter.net/jeffb25165
Guest User
1/18/2005
Gave the wronk link. Its http://webpages.charter.net/jeffb25165
Guest User
1/18/2005
Hi Maildude. I looked at your pictures. 1) To prevent rusting of the edges and potential other problems, most manufacturers want these panels to be cut with a shearing action, not a saw. 2) Some of these panels are installed in lapped sheets. I'd be curious what the manufacturer of your roof would say. This turns into an aesthetics issue as well of course. 3) Aesthetics issue though I also worry that no sort of closure was used on the panel ends at the valleys nor perhaps at the ridge either. 4) You're correct. No trim. 5) You're correct. 6) Hmmmm ... not the only thing he did wrong I am sorry to say. On all of the above, you really need to contact the manufacturer of the roofing and get their input. I am sorry about the problems you have had. I would also have some concern about all of the scratches on the panels.
Guest User
1/19/2005
I looked at your pictures and I was shocked at the install. It seems you have a lot of areas that water can get into. I would ask the roofer to do stop what he is doing. Get a second opinion of the installation and don't pay him any more money until he does the job correct.That is one terrible installation. Just my .02 and I am a home owner too looking into metal roofs...
Guest User
1/19/2005
Mr. Miller, could you please elaborate on the other things you see that are wrong. I did call the manufacturer and they were very evasive about telling me proper install technics, i.e. 30# felt was recommended but not required. They also did not have printed install guidelines (or they wouldn't make them available to me). FYI, the metal is from Bessemer Metal Products of Bessemer, Al. I called another supplier, Alabama Sheet Metal, and they were super helpful considering I didn't even get the metal from them. They gave me the number of their best installer and he's coming Friday to look at the damage.
Guest User
1/19/2005
Thanks for your posting. I have the following additional concerns: 1) No closures on the bottom ends of the panels. 2) Concerned over whether the overlap of the panels is correct. Looks like they installed the uphill panels first and slipped the lower ones up under them. That is not the normal procedure. 3) Concerned that water could get behind the wall flashings. 4) Lots of 15 pound felt has been used under metal roofing. I prefer 30 though. 5) Photo 28 concerns me that water could wash up under the panels on the left but it might be a matter of perspective and how the picture was taken. 6) The ridge cap lap in #31 looks very prone to wind damage or water infiltration. 7) I don't understand Photo 32 but it doesn;t look very good. 8) I am concerned that the vent pipe flashing looks poorly installed. I hope this helps. It is probably none of my business but I would ask Bessemer to come look at the roof.
Guest User
3/26/2006
I'm sure that the "metal pro's" won't let this through but I'll send it anyway just for the hell of it.It looks from your pictures that your thinking was to get a cheap install on a "lifetime roof".Your first mistake was hiring a nickel and dime contractor to do a very important piece of work.The roof protects everything under it so it's the wrong place to cut corners.Higher a pro or expect problems. Your second mistake was in thinking that a metal roof was the "lifetime" roof it's advertised to be. I get 10 calls everytime it rains from people who just can't believe that thier miracle roof is letting in enough water to float a boat in thier living room.Stck with asphalt, shake's or tile and higher a good contractor and you won't have any problems.And your house won't look like an old garden shed to boot.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
3/27/2006
Hi Charlie. I have the power -- with one keystroke, I could delete your evil post. Bwahahahaha... But I won't because, really, I agree with you on many points. Now, I am not going to go so far as accusing the previous writer of trying to get a metal roof for a cheap cost. I do not know what went into their decision making process. However, fact is, we continue to suffer from folks out there, including contractors and distributors and other suppliers who are just downright misinformed about metal roofing. There are even people manufacturing this stuff who don't understand it. Groups like the Metal Roofing Alliance and its members are working hard to educate the general public as well as industry members. The way I look at it, four things go into determining the overall success of a metal roofing system: 1) The base metal itself -- type and quality 2) The coating or finish -- type and quality 3) The appropriateness of the roof system for the particular job at hand -- interms of "looks" and technical attributes. 4) The quality and experience of the installer. I do differ with you though in that successful metal roofs are going up all the time. I have involvement with probably 3000+ homes each and every year that are roofed with metal. It does work, and it can look very good but all parties involved must have an understanding of metal roofing, the differences between products, and the resulting quality differences. If you look at the pictures on this website, look at the pictures on my company's websites (www.classicroof.com) or on my colleague Al Reid's website (www.duraloc.com) ... none of these look like garden sheds. Metal roofing has proven itself for 100s of years. It can look good and be long lasting and provide other benefits including fire safety, low weight, energy efficiency and increased home value. Like any "new" product that changes the world so to speak, we have some educational processes to go through. We're making great strides in that area and we continue to work hard in that area. Consumers who want a good metal roof can get a good metal roof. Thank you for posting, Charlie! I hope your posting can serve as an eye-opener for many people before they make a bad choice!
Guest User
4/17/2006
Charlie, Thank you for the information. We are looking at purchasing a new home. All of the homes in the subdivision have Metal Roofs. Having lived in my current home for the past 18 years, we are aware of bad installations of roofs. Our roof did not have the flashing that was required. Hence, rood leaks and then termites. My question to you is, What should a layman look for during instruction and what should we be asking the contractor to insure that we are getting a good roof? Is there a website which I can go to. Thank you, Diane Scargill
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
4/17/2006
Hi Diane, One of the purposes of this webiste is to educate ... also to hook homeowners up with experienced metal roofing contractors through our Find A Contractor section. Ask for references ... go look at past jobs and talk to past customers. Verify that the same individuals will be installing your roof. Know what product you're buying. Know what base metal and coating it has. Know what warranty you are getting from the manufacturer and from the installer. If you wish, obtain installation instructions from the manufacturer and review them. Discuss any unusual roof situations you have with the contractor. Know what they intend to do. Verify with the manufacturer that their plan is acceptable. Take pictures during the installation process if you wish ... feel free to forward them to the manufacturer for review. Do I think that every job should go to these extremes? No, but in certain cases, these are not bad things to do. A good contractor and a good manufacturer will not be upset if you do these things.
Guest User
8/6/2007
OMG instead of contating the manufacture get a lawyer. Just my 2 cents worth.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
8/6/2007
I didn't realize that lawyers were good at roofing. Call all the attorneys you want but at the end of the day, you still have a roof that needs fixed. If the manufacturer can help make that happen, why wouldn't you contact them?
Guest User
2/29/2008
metal roofing should never be cut with a jig saw or skill saw, the metal shavings will damage the coating and will begin to rust in a very short time.
Guest User
9/16/2009
I need help. I am a 62 year 'young' grandmother who is living her dream. I purchased a 25 year old A frame on a lake. It needs a roof. There is moss growing on the roof and a air unit is inserted in the lower half of the roof. I have been told there is no problem w/ leaving the existing roof after it has been 'washed' is this correct? Also, can the roof be successfully installed around the old air unit or should I purchase a new unit or relocate to a wall? Thank you
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
9/20/2009
I would suggest underlayment over the old roofing but, yes, this can be done. If you think you may someday change the air unit, then I would do that now. Otherwise, yes, the roof can accommodate it.
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